Jan 4, 2018

Trump's White House meeting with Senate Republicans on immigration

President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House. Photo: Evan Vucci / AP

President Trump on Thursday meets with Republican senators in the Roosevelt Room to discuss one of the most urgent issues of the new year: immigration reform, including border-security measures to balance possible extended protection for "Dreamers."

Why this matters: DACA is the thorniest political issue Trump and the Republican Party have to contend with over the next month. If mishandled it could tear the party apart.

White House spokesman Hogan Gidley says Trump "looks forward to meeting with Senators to discuss the Administration's immigration reform plan."

  • "As the President has said many times, any DACA legislation must include critical reforms to secure the border with a wall, close dangerous loopholes that hamstring enforcement, and, crucially, the legislation must end chain migration and cancel the visa lottery. Immigration reform should serve the needs of American workers, families and taxpayers," Gidley said.

The scheduled attendees:

  • Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), Majority Whip
  • Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.)
  • Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.)
  • Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa)
  • Sen. James Lankford (R-Oklahoma)
  • Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.)

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