Powell in 2015. Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP

Jerome Powell, who is expected to be President Trump's pick to be the next chairman of the Federal Reserve, has supported the policies of current chairwoman Janet Yellen, the New York Times reports:

"Mr. Powell has consistently supported the Fed's campaign to stimulate economic growth, although he expressed some reservations in internal debates about the extent of those efforts. In recent years, he has backed the methodical unwinding of those efforts, and analysts expect he would seek to raise interest rates at about the same pace as Ms. Yellen.On regulatory policy, Mr. Powell has defended most changes made after the financial crisis as necessary to protect the broader economy, but he has said that he supports efforts to streamline those rules."

Why this matters: Trump's appointments to the Federal Reserve will be some of the most consequential of his administration. The Times reports he resisted pressure from conservatives to "make a larger change at the Fed" by appointing an "outspoken critic" like Stanford economist John Taylor.

Go deeper

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: McConnell urges White House not to strike stimulus deal before election — Republican senators defend Fauci as Trump escalates attacks.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots — University of Michigan students ordered to shelter-in-place.
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden has huge cash advantage over Trump as Election Day nears

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in Wilmington, Delaware, on Monday. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden had $177.3 million in the bank at the end of September, per the latest Federal Election Commission filings.

Why it matters: President Trump's re-election campaign reported having $63.1 million in the bank at the end of last month, as campaigning enters the final stretch ahead of Election Day on Nov. 3.

Court allows North Carolina mail-in ballots deadline extension

An absentee ballot election worker stuffs ballot applications at the Mecklenburg County Board of Elections office in Charlotte, North Carolina, in September. Photo: Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

North Carolina can accept absentee ballots that are postmarked Nov. 3, Election Day, until Nov. 12, a federal appeals court decided Tuesday in a 12-3 majority ruling.

Why it matters: The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling against state and national Republican leaders settles a lawsuit brought by a group representing retirees, and it could see scores of additional votes counted in the key battleground state.