Apr 25, 2017

Trump’s approval rating is rising among grassroots activists

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Although Trump's approval rating has reached a historic low, his support among grassroots activists — and their view of how much he has accomplished in the first 100 days — is only getting better, according to a new survey.

The details: Mark Meckler, co-founder of Tea Party Patriots, Citizens for Self-Governance, and the Convention of States Project, surveyed 3,312 grassroots activists and leaders representing all 50 states between April 20-24.

What they're saying: Although Meckler tells Axios the activists "don't pay attention to arbitrary deadlines," 55% gave Trump an A and 32% a B when asked to grade how hard he has worked to fulfill his campaign promises in the first 100 days of his presidency. Furthermore, 34% surveyed gave Republican leaders a D when grading how well they worked with Trump to help him fulfill these promises — that increased from a mere 21% at the 50-day mark.

Why this matters: Meckler's findings reveal that these activists and leaders who are working at the grassroots level to create change feel "more frustration with Congress. ...Congress is seen as an impediment to Trump getting things done."

How that changes their activism: "They understand that electing a president whose party controls both the House and the Senate is not enough to fix the federal government and it never will be," Meckler says. "They've realized it's going to be up to them to restore the balance of power and that it's never going to come from Washington, D.C."

Losers:

  • 85% gave an F to the media for the way the cover the Trump administration — that increased from 79% at the 50-day mark
  • 31% gave Congressional Republicans a C for their ability to fulfill legislative actions — down from 37% at the 50-day mark
  • 76% said Democrats refuse to accept the results of the election — up significantly from 50% at the 50-day mark

What's next: The respondents also ranked the issues most important to them at the 100-day mark, which included: repealing and replacing Obamacare; appointing constitutionalists to the courts; making our military stronger; meaningful tax reform; and eliminating ISIS.

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