Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Although Trump's approval rating has reached a historic low, his support among grassroots activists — and their view of how much he has accomplished in the first 100 days — is only getting better, according to a new survey.

The details: Mark Meckler, co-founder of Tea Party Patriots, Citizens for Self-Governance, and the Convention of States Project, surveyed 3,312 grassroots activists and leaders representing all 50 states between April 20-24.

What they're saying: Although Meckler tells Axios the activists "don't pay attention to arbitrary deadlines," 55% gave Trump an A and 32% a B when asked to grade how hard he has worked to fulfill his campaign promises in the first 100 days of his presidency. Furthermore, 34% surveyed gave Republican leaders a D when grading how well they worked with Trump to help him fulfill these promises — that increased from a mere 21% at the 50-day mark.

Why this matters: Meckler's findings reveal that these activists and leaders who are working at the grassroots level to create change feel "more frustration with Congress. ...Congress is seen as an impediment to Trump getting things done."

How that changes their activism: "They understand that electing a president whose party controls both the House and the Senate is not enough to fix the federal government and it never will be," Meckler says. "They've realized it's going to be up to them to restore the balance of power and that it's never going to come from Washington, D.C."

Losers:

  • 85% gave an F to the media for the way the cover the Trump administration — that increased from 79% at the 50-day mark
  • 31% gave Congressional Republicans a C for their ability to fulfill legislative actions — down from 37% at the 50-day mark
  • 76% said Democrats refuse to accept the results of the election — up significantly from 50% at the 50-day mark

What's next: The respondents also ranked the issues most important to them at the 100-day mark, which included: repealing and replacing Obamacare; appointing constitutionalists to the courts; making our military stronger; meaningful tax reform; and eliminating ISIS.

Go deeper

Ford names James Farley as new CEO amid ongoing turnaround effort

James Hackett, left, is retiring as Ford CEO. Jim Farley, right, takes over Oct. 1. Photo: Ford

Ford announced Tuesday that James Farley will take over as its next CEO, replacing James Hackett, 65, who is retiring after three years in the job.

Why it matters: It leaves Farley to complete the company's ongoing turnaround effort. The transition will be that much harder as the industry tries to navigate the coronavirus-induced economic slowdown which shuttered Ford plants for two months on the eve of some of its most important vehicle launches.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Watch the full "Axios on HBO" interview with President Trump

In this episode of “Axios on HBO”, President Trump discusses his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, the upcoming election and much more with National Political Correspondent Jonathan Swan.

The interview was filmed on Tuesday, July 28 and aired Monday, Aug. 3 on HBO.

Mergers and acquisitions make a comeback

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A slew of high-profile headlines led by Microsoft's expected acquisition of social media video app TikTok helped bring the Nasdaq to another record high on Monday.

Why it matters: The mergers-and-acquisitions market looks like it's bouncing back, joining the revived credit and equity markets as well as the market for new public companies through IPOs and special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs).