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Greg Ruben / Axios

It's almost time for Trumpcare to go to the floor! But first, who's ready for another really long day in a committee hearing room? That's great, because the Rules Committee is ready to spend many hours talking about amendments that will never get a vote. Unless they decide to give the Freedom Caucus one floor vote to make them happy.

Here's what to watch today:

  • The Rules Committee meets at 10 am to plow through more than 20 amendments, most of which will never go to the House floor. But there's one substitute by Freedom Caucus member Mo Brooks that would completely repeal Obamacare, so watch to see if he gets a vote. Same with Rep. Joe Barton's amendment to end Medicaid expansion faster.
  • Health and Human Services secretary Tom Price is signaling to his former House colleague that the administration is done negotiating on amendments. "At some point, you've got to put down the pens, and the hour is late," he said yesterday on the Hugh Hewitt show.
  • President Trump is sure to keep working on Republicans himself, following his visit to Capitol Hill yesterday and a meeting with moderate Republicans at the White House.
  • Trump has made progress in winning over moderates, and some conservatives are dropping their opposition because of the latest changes to the bill — including Rep. Gary Palmer of Alabama, who voted against the bill in the House Budget Committee but now supports it.
  • There are still a lot of holdouts, even after the Trump visit. Republicans can only lose 21 votes, and multiple reports suggested they're currently losing more than that. (The New York Times reports they could be short by as many as three dozen votes.)
  • From a leadership source late yesterday: "We are moving members. Going in the right direction. Still working."
  • Two powerful conservative groups — Heritage Action and Americans for Prosperity — oppose the bill and are making this a "key vote," meaning they'll keep track of any Republicans who vote for it. (The National Right to Life Committee, however, is supporting it.)

Oh, and don't forget the Senate, where they can't lose more than two Republicans. So here's three who are opposing it: Sens. Susan Collins, Rand Paul, and now Mike Lee, who tweeted yesterday that "I am a no." Wait your turn, Senate. Stop stealing attention from the House.

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Why it matters: The Senate can now resume voting on other amendments to the broader rescue bill.

Capitol review panel recommends more police, mobile fencing

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A panel appointed by Congress to review security measures at the Capitol is recommending several changes, including mobile fencing and a bigger Capitol police force, to safeguard the area after a riotous mob breached the building on Jan. 6.

Why it matters: Law enforcement officials have warned there could be new plots to attack the area and target lawmakers, including during a speech President Biden is expected to give to a joint session of Congress.

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Texas has thawed out after an Arctic freeze last month threw the state into a power crisis. But the financial turmoil from power grid shock is just starting to take shape.

Why it matters: In total, electricity companies are billions of dollars short on the post-storm payments they now owe to the state's grid operator. There's no clear path for how they will pay — something being watched closely across the country as extreme weather events become more common.