Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The chairs of the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees released a memo and draft subpoena on Wednesday that would compel the White House to turn over documents related to their impeachment inquiry into President Trump's alleged efforts to push Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden.

"The White House’s flagrant disregard of multiple voluntary requests for documents—combined with stark and urgent warnings from the Inspector General about the gravity of these allegations—have left us with no choice but to issue this subpoena."
— Chairs Adam Schiff, Elijah Cummings and Eliot Engel

The big picture: The committees are giving the White House until Friday to respond to a voluntary request for documents that was first submitted on Sept. 9. House Democrats are pursuing the impeachment inquiry on a rapid timeline, already having issued subpoenas to Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

Between the lines: Immense pressure from House Democrats is part of what ultimately forced the White House to release a summary of Trump's now-infamous phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. It remains to be seen how the Trump administration will respond to the new wave of subpoenas, but Pompeo on Tuesday told the committees that he will not allow State Department officials to be "intimidated" into testifying.

  • In response, the chairs warned Pompeo that he was a witness in the investigation — since he has admitted to being on the Trump-Ukraine call — and that efforts to block testimony would be considered evidence of obstruction in the House's impeachment inquiry.

Read the draft subpoena:

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What they're saying: Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading political figures reacted to President Trump's Saturday afternoon nomination of federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

What they're saying: "President Trump could not have made a better decision," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement. "Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States."

Amy Coney Barrett: "Should I be confirmed, I will be mindful of who came before me"

Trump introduces Amy Coney Barrett as nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Olivier Douleiry/Getty Images

In speaking after President Trump announced her as the Supreme Court nominee to replaced Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett said on Saturday she will be "mindful" of those who came before her on the court if confirmed.

What she's saying: Barrett touched on Ginsburg's legacy, as well as her own judicial philosophy and family values. "I love the United States and I love the United States Constitution," she said. "I'm truly humbled at the prospect of serving on the  Supreme Court."