Alayna Treene Jan 27, 2017
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Trump triggers liberal millennials to run for office

Evan Vucci / AP

In the week since Trump's inauguration, a new organization, Run for Something, says it has recruited more than 1,200 millennials to run for local office. The organization — co-founded by Amanda Litman, Hillary Clinton's former email director (the other emails, she points out); and Ross Morales Rocketta, a former management consultant at Deloitte — recruits Democrats under 35 to run for office, and promises to provide them with the resources they need to get their names on the ballot.

Litman told Axios that the Women's March on Saturday has been great for engagement, not only encouraging more recruits but also leading over 600 people to donate to their non-profit. When asked if interest was concentrated to certain states in particular, Litman said that surprisingly they've seen applicants from both blue and red states alike.

Why this matters: Movements like Run for Something have been gaining traction ever since the November election, thanks to fired-up progressives angered by Trump's win. These organizations have garnered support from all different sides of the Democratic party to achieve a common goal: resist Trump.

Jonathan Swan 41 mins ago
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Bolton bombshell: the clashes to come

John Bolton
John Bolton speaks at CPAC in 2016. Photo: Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sources close to President Trump say he feels John Bolton, hurriedly named last night to replace H.R. McMaster as national security adviser, will finally deliver the foreign policy the president wants — particularly on Iran and North Korea.

Why it matters: We can’t overstate how dramatic a change it is for Trump to replace H.R. McMaster with Bolton, who was U.S. ambassador to the U.N. under President George W. Bush.

Erica Pandey 1 hour ago
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How China became a powerhouse of espionage

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

As China’s influence spreads to every corner of the globe under President Xi Jinping, so do its spies.

Why it matters: China has the money and the ambition to build a vast foreign intelligence network, including inside the United States. Meanwhile, American intelligence-gathering on China is falling short, Chris Johnson, a former senior China analyst for the CIA who's now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells Axios: "We have to at least live up to [China's] expectations. And we aren't doing that."