Alex Brandon / AP

"Trump drops China bashing during warm Xi summit," by AFP's Andrew Beatty in Palm Beach: "The friendly tone was a far cry from Trump's acerbic campaign denouncements ... Xi reciprocated Trump's warm words, saying the summit had 'uniquely important significance.'"

  • "Beijing's most powerful leader in decades also invited the neophyte US president on a coveted state visit to China later in the year. Trump accepted, with a date yet to be determined."
  • "The bonhomie extended behind closed doors, where the US president's grandson and granddaughter sang a traditional Chinese ballad — 'Jasmine Flower' — and recited poetry for their honored guests, earning praise from their 'very proud' mother Ivanka in a tweet."
  • "There appeared to be little in the way of concrete achievements during 24 hours in the sun, but officials said that a rapport had been built that will carry on the next four years. The US leader appeared confident.

From the White House readout: "President Trump noted the importance of adhering to international rules and norms in the East and South China Seas and to previous statements on non-militarization. He also noted the importance of protecting human rights and other values deeply held by Americans."

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