Mar 10, 2018

Trump responds to California hostage situation at Veterans Home

Chris Childs, assistant chief of the California Highway Patrol, speaks at a press conference after a hostage situation at the Veterans Home of California. Photo: Stephen Lam / Getty Images

After an almost eight-hour standoff on Friday at the Veterans Home of California, officials found the gunman and three female hostages dead on Friday night, CNN reports.

What happened: The gunman, a former client of the facility identified as 36-year-old Albert Wong, "barged into a going-away party" for some of the employees, per CNN. Law enforcement responded to the scene a little after 10 a.m., following reports of gunfire. Police entered the room at the veterans home believed to be where the hostages were being held shortly before 6 p.m., finding Wong and the hostages dead.

  • The home is the largest veterans care facility in the country, operating as a men's "residential recovery program for veterans" from Iraq and Afghanistan that suffer from brain injury and PTSD, the LA Times reports.
  • California Sen. Bill Dodd told ABC affiliate, ABC7, that Wong had suffered "from post-traumatic stress disorder" after serving in the Middle East, per the LA Times.. He was "asked to leave the facility earlier in the week."
  • Per the L.A. Times, the three women were identified as: executive director of the facility, Christine Loeber, 48; therapist Jen Golick, 42; and San Francisco Department of Veterans Affairs and Healthcare System psychologist, Jennifer Gonzales, 29.

Go deeper

The new oil-cutting pact will help the market but hardly rescue it

The new OPEC-Russia agreement to steeply cut production should help the oil market avoid a complete meltdown, but it's nowhere near enough to undo the damage from the COVID-19 pandemic, analysts say.

Why it matters: It's the first major coordinated response to the pandemic that's creating an unprecedented collapse in global oil demand and has pushed prices to very low levels.

Premier League players launch fund to help U.K. medical workers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Premier League players have launched an initiative called #PlayersTogether, which will funnel part of their salaries to the National Health Service to support the U.K.'s front-line workers during the coronavirus crisis.

Why it matters: This decision came at the conclusion of a protracted argument between players, clubs and even government officials over who should bear the brunt of lost revenue in the midst of the pandemic.

Go deeperArrow52 mins ago - Sports

GOP worries Trump has only weeks to sharpen coronavirus response

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Republicans are increasingly concerned not only about President Trump’s daily briefings but also his broader plan to ease the nation out of the virus crisis and back to work. This concern is acute — and spreading. 

Why it matters: Trump can easily address the briefing worries by doing fewer, but the lackluster bounce-back planning is what worries Republicans most.