President Trump at the White House on June 26. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Republican satisfaction with the way things are going in the U.S. has dropped significantly since April, falling close to Democratic dissatisfaction, according to a survey by the Pew Research Center.

Why it matters: Until June 30, Republican satisfaction with the state of the country had stayed above 50% for nearly all of Trump’s presidency, according to Pew. The latest survey shows 19% of Republicans and those who lean Republican are satisfied with the direction of the country, compared to 7% of Democrats and those who lean Democrat.

The big picture: President Trump's steady approval ratings within the Republican Party may be eroding as unemployment claims persist and coronavirus infections surge in most of the country. His response to protests against racial injustice earlier this month has also left top Republicans uneasy about his re-election prospects.

By the numbers: Joe Biden is leading Trump 54% to 44% when it comes to voter preference, with strong advantages over the incumbent in terms of temperament and empathy.

  • 63% of Republicans say they feel angry about the state of the U.S., while nearly 78% of Democrats report the same.
  • 56% of Republicans say they are fearful about the state of the country, while 75% of Democrats report the same — marking a wider partisan split.
  • Only one quarter of Republicans told Pew that they felt proud when thinking about the country in its current state.

Flashback: 74% of Americans said in an AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll earlier this month that the country is heading in the wrong direction, including 63% of Republicans — up from 42% in May.

Methodology: 4,708 adults — including 3,577 registered voters — surveyed in June 16-22 through a national, random sampling in Pew’s American Trends Panel (ATP). MOE ± 1.8 percentage points.

Go deeper

2020 election strategy: Hire all the lawyers

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The coronavirus has sent overall U.S. unemployment into the double digits — but it's a sort of full-employment act for election law attorneys.

The big picture: The prospect of extended court fights over COVID-19-related voting changes, an absentee ballot avalanche, foreign interference and contested presidential results has prompted a hire-all-the-lawyers binge by candidates and campaigns — not just in swing states but around the country.

Updated 39 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 19,451,097 — Total deaths: 722,835 — Total recoveries — 11,788,665Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2. p.m. ET: 4,968,413 — Total deaths: 161,858 — Total recoveries: 1,623,870 — Total tests: 60,415,558Map.
  3. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective.
  4. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  5. Schools: How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.
1 hour ago - World

What's next for Lebanon after the Beirut explosion

Photo: Houssam Shbaro/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Beirut residents are still clearing rubble from streets that appear war-torn, days after a blast that shocked the country and horrified the world.

Why it matters: The explosion is likely to accelerate a painful cycle Lebanon was already living through — discontent, economic distress, and emigration.