Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President Trump's advisers are sounding alarms about his re-election prospects to a degree not heard since the president entered the White House three and a half years ago.

The state of play: Over the past week, widespread panic and pessimism have set in.

  1. Early optimism about a booming economic comeback has dampened because of new coronavirus outbreaks across the country.
  2. Early hopes that Trump’s return to rallies would bring back momentum has dampened because of the Tulsa rally debacle — and because advisers have recognized that Trump's elderly base is more fearful of the virus than previously realized.
  3. Trump, relentlessly, keeps committing egregious self-defeating acts — the latest being tweeting a video in which an elderly supporter chants "white power."

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Trump's month of hell

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Over the last 29 days, President Trump has stared down a month of hell — a relentless barrage of reporting and developments that have seriously damaged his re-election hopes.

Why it matters: Polls already showed that Trump faced a difficult path to re-election before his middle-of-the-night revelation that he has coronavirus. And with just over a month until Election Day, there's no telling what the next 32 days could have in store for the president.

Updated 36 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. States: Nearly two dozen Minnesota COVID cases traced to 3 Trump campaign events
  6. World: Restrictions grow across Europe.
  7. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.

Republicans and Dems react to Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation

President Trump stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett after she took the constitutional oath to serve as a Supreme Court justice during a White House ceremony Monday night .Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Trump said Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation to the Supreme Court and her subsequent taking of the constitutional oath Monday was a "momentous day," as she she vowed to serve "without any fear or favour."

  • But as Republicans applauded the third conservative justice in four years, many Democrats including Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) warned of consequences to the rush to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ahead of the Nov. 3 election, with progressives leading calls to expand the court.