Majdi Mohammed / AP

A narrative is catching on among pro-Israel hardliners that President Trump's envoy to the Middle East, Jason Greenblatt, is getting too close politically to the widely hated Israeli politician Tzipi Livni.

The argument, as laid out by an unnamed official quoted in the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, is that Livni has become a "mentor" of sorts to Greenblatt — and that he's meeting with her regularly and potentially undermining the Israeli Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu.

Why this matters: Greenblatt is now dealing with what every American envoy to the Middle East ultimately has to confront. It's the most complicated region in the world and every encounter will be magnified and blown out of proportion.

The (much more boring) reality: Greenblatt and Livni have met and spoken with each other, yet while he respects her they are hardly close. He met Livni for the first time on Friday March 24, when she visited Washington. Two administration sources with direct knowledge of the encounter said Israeli ambassador Ron Dermer also attended the meeting. Livni then joined Greenblatt for Shabbat dinner. Two days later Greenblatt met with Naftali Bennett, who leads Israel's right-wing Jewish Home party, and on May 9 he had his second and final meeting with Livni. Dermer and the U.S. ambassador to Israel David Friedman both attended that second meeting.

What to know about Livni: She's a major figure in Israeli politics — so it makes sense that Greenblatt would meet with her — but she's highly controversial, loathed by the Right, Left, and just about everyone in between. Much of the Israeli Right can't stand her because they think she's a traitor to their cause. She came up through the right-wing, was once a hawk, and is now regarded by hardliners as a sell out to the Palestinians. And because of her political history, the Israeli left will probably never trust her.

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Biden raises $141 million more than Trump

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a September campaign event in Wilmington, Delaware. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden's campaign, the Democratic National Committee and joint fundraising committees raised $466 million cash on hand, the presidential candidate's team announced late Sunday.

Why it matters: President Trump's campaign raised $325 million, his campaign communications director Tim Murtaugh announced Friday. In the spring, Biden was $187 million behind Trump and the Republican National Committee.

Driving the news: Slower spending by Biden's campaign and heavy spending by Trump's in the spring and record summer fund-raising hauls that spiked after he named Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) as his running mate contributed to the turnaround, notes the New York Times, which first reported the news.

Editor's note: This is a developing news story. Please check back for updates.

Virtual Emmys address chaotic year for American TV and society

Emmy Host Jimmy Kimmel during rehearsals Friday for the 72nd Annual Emmy Awards at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Photo: Al Seib/ Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The Emmy Awards Sunday night addressed the major U.S. issues this year — including the protests on systemic racism and police brutality, the wildfires engulfing parts of the West Coast, the census, the pandemic, essential works and the election.

Why it matters: Award shows have always addressed wider cultural issues, but this year — amid unprecedented stress and uncertainty — that trend has accelerated.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30p.m. ET: 6,799,141 — Total deaths: 199,474 — Total recoveries: 2,590,671 — Total tests: 95,108,559Map.
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  4. Education: What we overlooked in the switch to remote learning.
  5. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19 — 7 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  6. World: England sets £10,000 fine for breaking self-isolation rules — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.