President Trump speaking to supporters at a rally. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

"How the Administration’s loyalists are quietly reshaping American governance," by The New Yorker's Evan Osnos, who "spoke to dozens of men and women throughout the federal government about Trump’s war on Washington."

Why it matters: The ethos of the Trump administration and how it views some facts is changing the way Washington operates.

  • "In one agency after another, I encountered a pattern: on controversial issues, the Administration is often not writing down potentially damaging information."
  • "For many in government, Trump’s antagonistic relationship to facts is no longer just a matter of politics. It now affects day-to-day governance."
  • "Midway through its second year, Trump’s White House is at war within and without, racing to banish the 'disloyals' and to beat back threatening information."
  • "Bit by bit, the White House is becoming Trump’s Emerald City [as the Green Zone in Baghdad came to be called]: isolated, fortified against nonbelievers, entranced by its mythmaker, and constantly vulnerable to the risks of revelation."

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 32,626,165 — Total deaths: 990,134 — Total recoveries: 22,523,822Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 p.m. ET: 7,040,313 — Total deaths: 203,918 — Total recoveries: 2,727,335 — Total tests: 99,488,275Map.
  3. States: U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases — "We’re not closing anything going forward": Florida fully lifts COVID restaurant restrictions.
  4. Health: Young people accounted for 20% of cases this summer — The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

America on edge as unrest rises

Louisville on Wednesday. Photo: Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Rarely have national security officials, governors, tech CEOs and activists agreed as broadly and fervently as they do about the possibility of historic civil unrest in America.

Why it matters: The ingredients are clear for all to see — epic fights over racism, abortion, elections, the virus and policing, stirred by misinformation and calls to action on social media, at a time of stress over the pandemic.

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Health

The long-term pain of the mental health pandemic

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A less visible but still massive trauma caused by the coronavirus is becoming clear: our mental health is suffering with potentially long-lasting consequences.

Why it matters: Mental health disorders that range from schizophrenia to depression and anxiety exert a severe cost on personal health and the economy. Addressing that challenge may require out-of-the-box solutions.