President Trump refused to say on "Fox News Sunday" whether he would accept the results of November's election if he loses to Joe Biden, telling host Chris Wallace: "I have to see. I'm not just going to say yes. I'm not going to say no."

Why it matters: Trump gave a similar answer in 2016 when he was running against Hillary Clinton, prompting concerns there might not be a peaceful transition to power. At that time, however, Trump was not the incumbent.

  • Trump said his willingness to concede will depend on mail-in voting, which he said he thinks is going to "rig the election" — a claim he has previously made without factual evidence.

What he's saying: "I'm not a good loser. I don't like to lose. I don't lose too often. ... Look, Hillary Clinton asked me the same thing. ... You know what, she's the one who never accepted the loss."

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The top Republicans who aren't voting for Trump in 2020

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said Wednesday that he cannot support President Trump's re-election.

Why it matters: Baker, a moderate governor in a deep-blue state, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.

America's split screen

Photo: Evan Vucci/AP

Tonight's dueling town halls were like a choose-your-own-ending book, letting us peer into the future and see what the two election outcomes would be like.

The big picture: The contrast reflects one of the big questions about Trump that's before Americans as they vote — Are you captivated, or are you exhausted?

Scoop: Trump's advisers brace for loss, point fingers

Stepien stands behind Trump on Air Force One Aug. 28. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Three senior Trump advisers who recently talked to campaign manager Bill Stepien walked away believing he thinks they will lose.

The big picture: The Trump campaign is filled with internal blaming and pre-spinning of a potential loss, accelerating a dire mood that's driven by a daily barrage of bleak headlines, campaign and White House officials tell me.