President Trump has tweeted that his top economic advisor, Larry Kudlow, 70, had a heart attack and is in the hospital. The White House later said he's expected to make a full recovery.

The backdrop: Kudlow, a veteran of the Reagan administration who rose to prominence as a cable TV host and commentator, joined the Trump administration in March. He sharply defended Trump in an interview with CNN on Sunday, saying Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had "stabbed [the United States] in the back" with his comments following the G7 summit. Trump's tweet came just minutes before he was set to meet with North Korea's Kim Jong-un.

“Earlier today National Economic Council Director and Assistant to the President Larry Kudlow, experienced what his doctors say, was a very mild heart attack. Larry is currently in good condition at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and his doctors expect he will make a full and speedy recovery. The President and his Administration send their thoughts and prayers to Larry and his family,” Sarah Sanders, Press Secretary.

Updated 10:23pm with White House statement

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