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Protesters stand outside the Supreme Court on June 15. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

A federal judge ruled on Friday that the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) be restored to its full status, following the Supreme Court's decision that the Trump administration violated federal law when it ended the program.

Why it matters: Friday's decision would force the Trump administration to accept new DACA applications. However, the administration still has legal authority to try to end the program again.

Driving the news: The Supreme Court ruled 5-4 in June to uphold protections from deportation for roughly 649,000 unauthorized immigrants in the U.S., by finding that the administration violated federal law in the way it rescinded the program in 2017.

  • "The dispute before the Court is not whether DHS may rescind DACA. All parties agree that it may. The dispute is instead primarily about the procedure the agency followed in doing so," Justice Roberts wrote in the Supreme Court's opinion.

Flashback: Then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions revoked DACA in the fall of 2017, which kicked off a long process of lawsuits and federal court decisions leading to the Supreme Court taking up the case in November 2019, Axios' Stef Kight reports.

Read Friday's decision:

Go deeper: Coalition of businesses urges Trump to keep DACA in place following SCOTUS ruling

Go deeper

Oct 24, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Murkowski says she'll vote to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court

Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said Saturday that she'll vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday, despite her opposition to the process that's recently transpired.

The big picture: Murkowski's decision leaves Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) as the only Republican expected to vote against Barrett.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

Former Georgia Gov. Roy Barnes on the Senate runoffs

The future of U.S. politics, and all that flows from it, is in the hands of Georgia voters when they vote in two Senate runoffs on January 5.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the election dynamics with former Georgia Gov. Roy Barnes, a Democrat who served between 1999 and 2003.

2 hours ago - Health

Cuomo orders emergency hospital protocols as COVID capacity dwindles

Gov. Andrew Cuomo. Photo: Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said on Monday that struggling state hospital systems must transfer patients to sites that are not nearing capacity, as rising coronavirus cases and hospitalizations strain medical resources.

Why it matters: New York does not expect to get the same kind of help from thousands of out-of-state doctors and nurses that it got this spring, Cuomo acknowledged, as most of the country battles skyrocketing COVID hospitalizations and infections.