Jan 3, 2020

Christianity Today editor "surprised by the ethical naïveté" of Trump supporters

Trump and Pence campaign in Roanoke, Virginia in 2016. Photo: Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Mark Galli, editor in chief of Christianity Today, is "surprised by the ethical naïveté" of Trump supporters' response to his editorial, calling for the president to be removed from office, he told the New York Times on Thursday.

What he's saying: "There does seem to be widespread ignorance — that is the best word I can come up with — of the gravity of Trump’s moral failings. Some evangelicals will acknowledge he had a problem with adultery, but now they consider that a thing of the past."

  • "They bring up King David, but the difference is King David repented! Donald Trump has not done that," Galli told the Times.

Background: About 81% of evangelical Christians voted for Trump in 2016, according to Pew. 26% of voters in 2016 described themselves as white, born-again or evangelical Christians, per Pew.

  • Galli told the Times that he voted for a third-party candidate in 2016, emphasizing he did not support Trump or Hillary Clinton.
  • Galli is leaving the magazine on Friday, after previously announcing his retirement in October, long before his 0p-ed on Trump.

Go deeper: Trump's moves to shore up his evangelical base

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Trump touts record at megachurch event to boost evangelical following

President Trump stands in a prayer circle with faith leaders during a Evangelicals for Trump campaign event in Miami. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump received an ovation from a crowd at a predominantly Hispanic megachurch where he touted his immigration policies and southern border wall during the launch of a new coalition, "Evangelicals for Trump," on Friday in Miami, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: "Trump’s decision to launch the new group at one of the largest Latino evangelical churches in the nation was 'without a doubt' a reaction to" an op-ed Christianity Today released calling for the president's impeachment, the Post writes. Trump is counting on a strong evangelical vote in 2020, and his re-election campaign expects Evangelicals for Trump to expand before then.

Go deeperArrowJan 4, 2020

First look: Anti-Trump Republican video mocks "MAGA Church"

"MAGA Church," the first digital video from the Lincoln Project, a group of anti-Trump Republicans, takes aim at President Trump's standing with evangelical voters —interspersing clips of him talking about faith with videos of him speaking crudely.

Why it matters: Trump has recently taken steps to shore up his evangelical base after an editorial in Christianity Today, a magazine founded by the late Rev. Billy Graham, attacked his "gross immorality and ethical incompetence."

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020

Impeachment by the numbers

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Spencer Platt/Getty Images and Win McNamee/Getty Images

Take a step back, and little has changed in the political landscape four months after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi launched the inquiry against President Trump.

By the numbers: Trump's national approval numbers, public support for his removal and Joe Biden's place as the Democratic primary front-runner have held steady. Meanwhile, the GOP and Trump campaign are raising money off of impeachment.

Go deeperArrowJan 25, 2020