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Trump reportedly wants to curtail Chinese investment in the U.S.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

President Trump's trade agenda may soon include restrictions on Chinese investment in U.S. companies, according to Politico.

Bottom line: No specific details have leaked, but this seemingly could curtail the strengthening trend of Chinese money plunging into U.S. companies, including Silicon Valley tech startups. If restrictions are applied to big spenders like Alibaba or Tencent, there could be severe retribution for U.S. investors who play heavily in China.

From Politico:

Trump told Cabinet secretaries and top advisers during a meeting at the White House last week that he wanted to soon hit China with steep tariffs and investment restrictions in response to allegations of intellectual property theft, according to three people familiar with the internal discussions.

Just yesterday we wrote that Trump's decision to block Broadcom's purchase of Qualcomm was, in part, an indirect proxy in the IP protection fight to come against China.

  • Globalist optimist: Trump is known to change his mind on just about everything.
  • Protectionist optimist: Trump is now marching to the beat of his own drummer more than ever before, and that drummer thinks trade wars are good.
Erica Pandey 6 hours ago
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How China became a powerhouse of espionage

Illustration: Sarah Grillo / Axios

As China’s influence spreads to every corner of the globe under President Xi Jinping, so do its spies.

Why it matters: China has the money and the ambition to build a vast foreign intelligence network, including inside the United States. Meanwhile, American intelligence-gathering on China is falling short, Chris Johnson, a former senior China analyst for the CIA who's now at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, tells Axios: "We have to at least live up to [China's] expectations. And we aren't doing that."

Caitlin Owens 7 hours ago
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Congress doesn't love the spending bill, but it passed anyway

Congressional leaders
Speaker Paul Ryan, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi. (Photo: Matt McClain / The Washington Post via Getty Images)

House Speaker Paul Ryan touted the defense spending increase, Sen. Rand Paul angrily tweeted about arcane government spending, and Democrats shook their head at the lack of gun control measures. But most members of Congress accepted the omnibus spending bill for what it is: A giant collection of what has to get done to keep the government functioning, while mustering enough votes to pass.

Why it matters: This is a $1.3 trillion dollar bill affecting every branch of government that passed mostly because it had to. Members voted on it without really reading it, as it was released Wednesday night and passed the Senate shortly after midnight Friday.