Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In 2016, the Trump campaign's voter database placed 3.5 million Black voters in a category called "deterrence" with the aim of trying to discourage them from voting, according to an investigation by a British TV network.

Driving the news: The U.K.'s Channel Four News got a hold of what it says is the Trump campaign's 2016 voter database of nearly 200 million records.

  • In battleground states each voter was placed in one of eight "audiences" organized to facilitate targeting Facebook ads. "Deterrence" was one of these categories.

The big picture: Trump won the election despite losing the popular vote by squeezing out victories in a handful of swing states.

  • Facebook's critics have long maintained that the victory was propelled by a fat budget spent on Facebook ads carefully targeted at swing-state voters with help from a Facebook employee embedded with the campaign and data insights provided by the now-disbanded British company Cambridge Analytica.

Yes, but: No one knows whether Trump's Facebook advertising was actually effective, and the ads themselves are no longer retrievable for study.

  • Some misinformation experts argue that the leak of hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton campaign aided Trump more than the targeted Facebook ads.

What's next: We're about to enter the final month of the sequel to this movie.

Go deeper

Facebook will resume political ad ban in Georgia after polls close

Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

Following the Georgia runoff elections, the Facebook ban that restricts ads on social issues, elections and politics nationwide will be reimplemented in the state, the company said on Tuesday.

The big picture: The company has been trying to adapt its political ad policies in real time to curb confusion and possible misinformation around the election results.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Jan 6, 2021 - Technology

Facebook's hardware gains traction

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Picture Alliance, Amy Osborne/Getty Images

Year-end sales numbers are telling Facebook executives that their big bet on hardware is starting to pay off.

Driving the news: Facebook's hardware team found itself just where it hoped to be for the holiday shopping season: under the Christmas tree, with both Quest 2 VR systems and Portal smart screens delivering better-than-expected sales.

Ina Fried, author of Login
Jan 6, 2021 - Technology

Twitter locks Trump out over election fraud tweets amid Capitol siege

Twitter logo. Photo: NurPhoto / Getty Images

After Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol Wednesday, Twitter removed three of the president's tweets and locked his account for 12 hours, saying it may ban him if he doesn't stop breaking its rules with his false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from him.

Why it matters: It's Twitter's strongest action against the president's account to date. A number of groups have called on Facebook and Twitter to fully suspend Trump's accounts.