Screenshot: The White House / YouTube

President Trump announced today that he will visit Parkland, Florida to "meet with families and local officials and continue coordinating the federal response" after yesterday's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 dead.

"Answer hate with love, answer cruelty with kindness. We must also work together to create a culture that embraces the dignity of life that creates deep and meaningful human connections and that turns classmates and colleagues into friends and neighbors."
— President Trump

More quotes from his brief address:

  • "Yesterday a school filled with innocent children and caring teachers became the scene of terrible violence, hatred, and evil."
  • "We are here for you. Whatever you need, whatever we can do to ease your pain … We are all joined together as one American family and your suffering is our burden also. No child, no teacher should ever be in danger in an American school."

What's next: President Trump mentioned that he'd make the "difficult issue" of mental health a priority and that "making our children safe" would be a top issue at an upcoming meeting with governors and state attorneys general. He made no mention of proposing or working on additional legislation surrounding gun control.

Earlier this morning: Trump tweeted his thoughts about the shooting, stating that the alleged shooter was "mentally disturbed" and that "neighbors and classmates...must always report such instances to authorities."

Go deeper: Mike Allen's look at our new normal in the era of mass shootings.

Go deeper

Pundits react to a chaotic debate: “What a dark event we just witnessed”

The first presidential debate between President Trump and Joe Biden in Cleveland on Tuesday night was a shouting match, punctuated by interruptions and hallmarked by name-calling.

Why it matters: If Trump aimed to make the debate as chaotic as possible with a torrent of disruptions, he succeeded. Pundits struggled to make sense of what they saw, and it's tough to imagine that the American people were able to either.

Trump to far-right Proud Boys: "Stand back and stand by"

Asked to condemn white supremacist violence at the first presidential debate on Tuesday, President Trump said the far-right Proud Boys group should "stand back and stand by," before immediately arguing that violence in the U.S. "is not a right-wing problem. This is a left-wing problem."

Why it matters: Trump has repeatedly been accused of failing to condemn white nationalism and right-wing violence, despite the FBI's assessment that it's the most significant domestic terrorism threat that the country faces. The president has frequently associated antifa and the left-wing violence that has afflicted some U.S. cities with Biden, despite his condemnation of violent protests.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The first Trump v. Biden presidential debate was a hot mess

Photos: Jim Watson and Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

This debate was like the country: Everybody’s talking. Nobody’s listening. Nothing is learned. It’s a mess.

  • We were told President Trump would be savage. Turned out, that was a gross understatement. Even the moderator, Fox News' Chris Wallace, got bulldozed.

Why it matters: Honestly, who the hell knows?