Jun 2, 2017

Trump against the world over Paris deal

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

In a Rose Garden address on Thursday, Donald Trump announced his intention to withdraw from the Paris climate accord. He faced instantaneous backlash from CEOs like Mark Zuckerberg and foreign leaders like Emmanuel Macron — not to mention his predecessor Barack Obama.

The White House is spinning that as a positive, claiming Trump was standing up for the American worker, no matter what the rich and powerful may think. As he said in his speech: "I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh — not Paris."

Quick hits

Read more: Shane Savitsky on Trump's speech

White House: they'll negotiate

Trump: "So we're getting out, but we'll start to negotiate, we'll see if we can make a deal that's fair."

Senior White House officials: "Other countries and our allies have a strong interest in coming to an agreement with the US. There is no question that other countries are going to want to sit down with us and talk about a potential way forward."

Read more: Alayna Treene on what the White House is saying

Europe: not so fast

Leaders of France, Germany, Italy: "We deem the momentum generated in Paris in December 2015 irreversible and we firmly believe that the Paris Agreement cannot be renegotiated, since it is a vital instrument for our planet, societies, and economies."

France's Macron (speaking in English!): "The United States has turned its back on the world, but France will not turn its back on Americans."

Read more: Shane Savitsky on the reaction from Europe

Silicon Valley revolt

Silicon Valley isn't happy with President Trump's decision. Elon Musk said he'd leave advisory councils run by the White House — though other tech execs will stay on — while Mark Zuckerberg, Tim Cook and other major figures from around the industry expressed disappointment.

Why it matters: This is yet another divide between Trump and Silicon Valley, and discontent over the move in the Valley is reflective of a broader backlash in corporate America (Disney's Bob Iger is also leaving the advisory board, and even ExxonMobil opposed the move).

Read more: David McCabe on the techworld reaction

What the world is reading
  • Earth to Trump: F*** You, Berliner Kurier, Germany
  • Europeans defy Trump and reject Paris renegotiation, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Germany
  • Trump passed on the best deal the planet has ever seen, The Guardian, U.K.
  • Donald Trump, the grave-digger of America's credibility, Le Temps, Switzerland
  • China and EU to tackle climate change together amid U.S. retreat, en.people.cn, China
  • Israeli greens slam Trump's decision to withdraw from Paris Agreement, Jerusalem Post, Israel
Obama's take

"The nations that remain in the Paris Agreement will be the nations that reap the benefits in jobs and industries created. I believe the United States of America should be at the front of the pack. But even in the absence of American leadership; even as this Administration joins a small handful of nations that reject the future; I'm confident that our states, cities, and businesses will step up and do even more to lead the way, and help protect for future generations the one planet we've got."

Read more: full statement

White House pushback
  • Topline: "The Paris Accord is a BAD deal for Americans"
  • Keeping promises: "[T]he President's action today is keeping his campaign promise to put American workers first."
  • The cost: Meeting the requirements in the Paris deal would cost the U.S. $3 trillion over the next several decades, plus the accord has a "UN Climate Slush Fund underwritten by American taxpayers"
  • The lost jobs: By 2040 the economy would lose 6.5 million industrial sector jobs

Read more: Shannon Vavra on the White House talking points

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U.S. coronavirus updates: Death toll surpasses 8,400

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Recorded deaths from the coronavirus surpassed 8,400 in the U.S. on Saturday, per Johns Hopkins data. The death toll in the U.S. has risen over 1,000 every day for the past four days, since April 1.

The big picture: President Trump said Saturday America's is facing its "toughest week, between this week and next week." Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the U.S. should expect to see deaths continue to rise in this period.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 30 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 1,197,405 — Total deaths: 64,606 — Total recoveries: 246,152Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 308,850 — Total deaths: 8,407 — Total recoveries: 14,652Map.
  3. Public health latest: CDC launches national trackers and recommends face coverings in public. Federal government will cover costs of COVID-19 treatment for uninsured. The virus is hitting poor, minority communities harder and upending childbirth.
  4. 2020 latest: "We have no contingency plan," Trump said on the 2020 Republican National Convention. "We're having the convention at the end of August."
  5. Business updates: Restaurants step up for health care workers. Employees are pressuring companies to provide protections during coronavirus.
  6. Oil latest: Monday meeting among oil-producing countries to discuss supply curbs is reportedly being delayed amid tensions between Saudi Arabia and Russia.
  7. Education update: Many college-age students won't get coronavirus relief checks.
  8. 1 🏀 thing: The WNBA postpones start of training camps and season.
  9. What should I do? Pets, moving and personal health. Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  10. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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World coronavirus updates: Spain tracks more cases than Italy

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

Spain overtook Italy in its number of coronavirus cases on Saturday. The global death toll has surpassed 62,000, per Johns Hopkins data.

The latest: About half the planet's population is on lockdown amid the coronavirus crisis. Fatalities are exponentially increasing across Europe, with roughly half of deaths worldwide located in Italy and Spain.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 7 hours ago - Health