Evan Vucci / AP

"Republicans say they are turning down job offers to work for a chief executive whose volatile temperament makes them nervous" and "are asking head-hunters if their reputations could suffer permanent damage," according to the WashPost lead story, by Lisa Rein and Abby Phillip:

  • "The White House picked up the hiring pace in May and the first half of June ... It has advanced 92 candidates for Senate confirmation, compared with 59 between Trump's inauguration and the end of April. But the Senate has just 25 working days until it breaks for the August recess."
  • "Trump has 43 confirmed appointees to senior posts, compared with the 151 top political appointees confirmed by mid-June in President Barack Obama's first term and the 130 under President George W. Bush."
  • A White House official said about 200 people are being vetted for senior-level posts.
  • White House press secretary Sean Spicer: "I have people knocking down my door to talk to the presidential personnel office ... There is a huge demand to join this administration."

Go deeper

Right-wing media defanged by dissolving anti-Biden storylines

Data: NewsWhip; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

The three biggest anti-Joe Biden storylines in right-wing media over the last year have either fizzled or are getting less online traction than they used to, according to data from NewsWhip provided exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: This dynamic has rendered a formidable media ecosystem less effective in boosting President Trump as we move into the heart of the 2020 campaign.

A coronavirus alarm bell is going off in the Midwest

Data: The COVID Tracking Project; Note: Positive rate shown is the 7-day average from June 1 to Aug. 6, 2020; Cartogram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

A cluster of states in the Midwest are seeing more of their coronavirus tests coming back positive — potentially an early indicator of a growing outbreak.

The state of play: A high positive rate means that a higher share of those getting tested are sick. That could be because there are more sick people, or because a state isn't doing enough testing.

Biden clarifies comments on African American and Latino communities

Joe Biden delivering a speech in Delaware in July. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Joe Biden explained on Twitter Thursday night what he "meant" by earlier comments suggesting that "the African American community is a monolith."

What they're saying: "Unlike the African-American community, with notable exceptions, the Latino community is an incredibly diverse community with incredibly different attitudes about different things," Biden remarked in an interview hosted by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association for Black Journalists, Politico reports.