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U.S. government work via Flickr

Dick Durbin, a high-ranking member of Democratic leadership in the Senate, lit into President Trump Tuesday over his attacks on the media — comparing them to tactics used by dictators the world over:

"The kinds of attacks on the media we're seeing in America would have seemed very similar to people living in the Ukraine or the Baltics when those nations were under Soviet [rule]. And it would seem familiar today in a lot of authoritarian states like Russia, Venezuela, Cuba, Turkey and Hungary. Turning reporters into enemies — not just adversaries, but enemies — is a strategy that strongmen use to silence critics."

The details: The Illinois Democrat said that the free press was under attack from the Russian government but also from the administration. He pointed to Trump's tweet earlier this month referring to the media as the "enemy of the American people" but was also rankled by oppositional comments made about the press by top White House staffers like Steve Bannon and Kellyanne Conway.

Worth noting: Durbin says he's privately heard concerns about Trump's posture towards the press from Republicans. "They say to me things like, 'We know you're worried, we're worried too,'" he told reporters, but noted that "that's about the best I can get out of them in the Senate gym."

Key context: Durbin made the comments during a speech to local broadcasters where he said the government should maintain libel laws, support public broadcasters and pass a federal shield law to protect journalists' sources. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
24 mins ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.

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