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Illustration: Axios Visuals

This story is from Codebook, the new Axios cybersecurity newsletter that launched today. Sign up here.

Election security is sucking up all the oxygen in policy conversations these days. Tom Ridge, former Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, worries Congress is letting other aspects of cybersecurity slip through the cracks.

Quoted: “No one thinks democracy is as important as Tom Ridge,” he said, “but our economic security is at stake.“

“We should be as obsessed with cybersecurity as we are with elections,” said Ridge, also a former Pennsylvania Governor and a recent add to the board of alliantgroup, which helps find tax rebates for cybersecurity firms.

  • Ridge worries that broad cybersecurity threats to businesses and critical infrastructure are being thrust to the wayside while lawmakers focus most of their attention on election security.
  • He believes lawmakers will need to focus on more than one aspect of cybersecurity at a time, which has so far been a difficult ask.
  • To wit: A few years ago, automotive hacking was the hip topic for legislation, but faded into the background when election hacking stole most of the attention. Election hacking even swallowed up the next major breach as well, even though Equifax's massive scope seemed tailor-made to spur legislation.

Homeland has no real home: Jurisdictional problems make legislation even more difficult, said Ridge. Despite having a committee called the Homeland Security Committee, every committee maintains an interest in the security of whatever it is it discusses. “Government wasn’t designed to regulate security,” he said. “I spent more time on The Hill talking to committees than Donald Rumsfeld, and the DOD had two wars going on.”

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The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.

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