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Photo: Michael Kappeler/picture alliance via Getty Images

The Tokyo Games are set to open amid high temperatures and humidity and a chance of typhoons, forcing organizers to deploy cooling stations around venues, according to Reuters.

Why it matters: While some outdoor events were moved to the cooler northern city of Sapporo, organizers are worried about heat-related illnesses occurring among athletes and staff who haven't become acclimated to Tokyo's muggy summers.

  • High temperatures and humidity can increase the risk of heat-related hospitalizations and deaths because sweat can't easily evaporate in those conditions.

By the numbers: July 23, the opening day of the Olympics, is forecast to hit a high of 88 degrees Fahrenheit before ticking up to 90°F on July 24.

The big picture: Team USA flag-bearers will be given jackets that have cooling systems inside of them for the Olympics and Paralympics opening ceremonies on July 26, according to ESPN.

The bottom line: Summer Olympics venues are going to have to increasingly adapt to hot weather as climate change continues

Go deeper: More Olympic athletes test positive for COVID in Tokyo

Go deeper

Updated Jul 20, 2021 - Science

FEMA chief heads West as large wildfires rage, heat wave peaks

Fire engulfs trees at the Tamarack fire in Central California on Saturday. Photo: Ty O'Neil/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

FEMA administrator Deanne Criswell will make her first trip to wildfire-affected states amid another dangerous week of extreme heat and "critical" fire weather conditions, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The West is experiencing its worst drought this century, and repeated, extreme heat waves have dried out forests and grasslands, priming them to burn. Officials are gearing up for an unprecedented, prolonged peak fire season.

Updated Jul 19, 2021 - Economy & Business

Olympics to miss the mark for many sponsors

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

The decision to move forward with the Olympics has put sponsors in a tricky position because the games are no longer the predictable investment that they were pre-pandemic.

The latest: Toyota — one of the Olympics' top sponsors — announced Monday that it will not be airing TV commercials in Japan related to the Games. Executives for Japan’s biggest automaker will also not be attending Friday's opening ceremony.

U.K. issues first ever extreme heat warning

People on Bournemouth beach in Dorset, southwest England, on Monday. Photo: Steve Parsons/PA Images via Getty Images

The United Kingdom's Met Office issued its first ever "Extreme Heat Warning" on Monday, after all four U.K. nations recorded their hottest day so far this year over the weekend.

Driving the news: "The impacts from extreme heat are increasing across the U.K. due to climate change," per a June Met Office statement announcing its new amber and red warning system to inform the public of potential widespread disruption and adverse health effects.