Oct 23, 2018

Tim Cook: Tech must embrace privacy to hold public trust

Tim Cook at Apple's September iPhone launch. Photo: Ina Fried/Axios

Apple CEO Tim Cook is making his strongest case yet that the tech industry must embrace privacy or lose its chance to reshape the world.

Why it matters: Apple has made user privacy a central component of its design and pitch to consumers, drawing a sharp contrast with companies like Facebook and Google.

Details: Cook is speaking Wednesday in Brussels to an international conference of privacy regulators. In the speech, he is expected to argue that technology can play a broad role in addressing some of humanity's greatest challenges, including disease and climate change — but only if it maintains public trust.

"We are optimistic about technology’s awesome potential for good. But we know that it won’t happen on its own," Cook plans to say, according to a source. “We will never achieve technology’s true potential without the full faith and confidence of the people who use it." 

Cook is also expected to:

  • Express support for a "comprehensive federal privacy law” in the U.S.
  • Reaffirm Apple's position that privacy is a fundamental human right
  • Praise Europe's GDPR as evidence that “good policy and political will can come together to protect the rights of us all.”  

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Pompeo tells Congress Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China

Photo: Nicholas Kamm/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said in a statement Wednesday that he has certified to Congress that Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China and does not warrant special treatment under U.S. law.

Why it matters: Revoking Hong Kong's special status would hasten its economic and financial decline, already set in motion by China's growing political grip on the city. The preferential status that the U.S. has long granted Hong Kong has made the city a top U.S. trading partner.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 5,618,829 — Total deaths: 351,146 — Total recoveries — 2,311,404Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 a.m. ET: 1,681,793 — Total deaths: 98,933 — Total recoveries: 384,902 — Total tested: 14,907,041Map.
  3. Public health: Fauci says data is "really quite evident" against hydroxychloroquine — Nearly half of Americans say someone in their household has delayed medical care.
  4. Tech: Zipline drones deliver masks to hospitals; vaccines could be next
  5. Business: Boeing to lay off 6,770 more U.S. employees.
  6. 🏒Sports: NHL unveils 24-team playoff plan to return from hiatus.
  7. What should I do? When you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus — Traveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

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Updated 52 mins ago - Politics & Policy