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Photo: Chesnot/Getty Images

TikTok announced new rules for its users on Wednesday to curb misinformation and manipulation ahead of the 2020 election.

Why it matters: The Chinese-owned karaoke app aims to show that its platform won't be vulnerable to election-related mischief and malice, as it weighs a deal to sell itself to Microsoft to forestall a ban by the Trump Administration.

What's new: The company announced 3 major changes to its content policy, which hadn't been amended since January.

  1. It's updating its policies on misleading content to more explicitly prohibit synthetic or manipulated content (i.e., deepfakes) "that misleads users by distorting the truth of events in a way that could cause harm." It's also making its policies on election meddling clearer by defining what it considers to be "coordinated inauthentic behavior."
  2. It's expanding fact-checking partnerships with PolitiFact and Lead Stories to screen potential misinformation related to the 2020 U.S. election. These partners already help TikTok fact-check around issues like climate change and COVID-19 misinformation. TikTok is also adding an in-app option for users to report election misinformation for review.
  3. It's working with with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Countering Foreign Influence Task Force (CFITF). TikTok didn't say much more about this partnership, but noted that it's also working with a number of "industry-leading threat assessment platforms" to help safeguard against inauthentic activity.

Be smart: TikTok has tried hard to stay away from politics, but as its platform grows, that's become more difficult.

The big picture: President Trump has given TikTok and Microsoft 45 days to hash out a deal after first threatening an immediate ban on TikTok.

  • TikTok users organized an effort that reportedly inflated signups for President Trump's ill-attended Tulsa rally in June. Some speculate that could have angered Trump and motivated him to try to ban TikTok.
  • There's also real bipartisan concern about TikTok's handling of U.S. user data in light of Chinese security laws, although the company says it stores none of that data in China or within its government's reach.

Go deeper

Facebook and Google extend political ad ban

Photo: SOPA Images / Getty Images

Facebook and Google are extending their bans on political ads to prevent confusion about the election, the Financial Times reported Wednesday.

Why it matters: While tech companies are trying to limit post-election misinformation, hundreds of millions of dollars are about to pour into Georgia, now that control of the Senate — and the fate of the next president's agenda — hinges on runoffs for now one, but both of the state's seats, set for Jan. 5.

Nov 12, 2020 - Technology

Election reality fails to pop GOP's online filter bubble

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Trump administration's fight to question the election's outcome is providing a massive field test of the effectiveness of online echo chambers and filter bubbles.

The state of play: So far, the evidence from the Trump universe shows partisan delusion winning out over objective reality.

2 hours ago - World

Iran confirms assassination of top nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadhe

The Iranian ministry of defense issued a statement on Friday confirming the assassination of Mohsen Fakhrizadhe, an Iranian scientist and the architect behind the Islamic Republic’s military nuclear program.

Why it matters: Fakhrizadhe was the head of the Amad project in the Iranian ministry of defense, which focused on developing a nuclear bomb until 2003.