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Photo: Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

Police reports and call logs relating to U.S. immigrant youth shelters examined by Pro Publica reveal "hundreds of allegations of sexual offenses, fights and missing children."

The big picture: Pro Publica reports that in the last five years, at least 125 reports of sex offenses have prompted a police response. There have been an additional 200 similar calls from other shelters, but they don't clarify if the reports are related to unaccompanied immigrants specifically.

The Department of Health and Human Services told Pro Publica in a statement that it "treats its responsibility for each child with the utmost care," and there is a "zero-tolerance policy for all forms of sexual abuse or inappropriate behavior."

  • It's unclear if the child victims in the reports were separated from their parents after crossing the border.

Immigrant children are particularly vulnerable to abuse because they may be unfamiliar with U.S. law, have experienced trauma in their home countries or don't speak English, Pro Publica reports.

Read the full report.

Go deeper

Cold December as safety nets expire

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Safety nets are likely to be yanked from underneath millions of vulnerable Americans in December, as the coronavirus surges.

Why it matters: Those most at risk are depending on one or more relief programs that are set to expire, right as the economic recovery becomes more fragile than it's been in months.

15 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

17 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.