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Evan Vucci / AP

The briefing was dominated by the NY Times bombshell that the sources behind Devin Nunes' claims that Trump may have been monitored by the Obama administration were reportedly White House officials. Spicer said he wouldn't comment because he didn't want to "condone" or "validate" the reporting, but he didn't dispute it either.

  • On who let Nunes onto White House grounds: Spicer said he didn't know, and that it was a double standard for the press to expect him to name names because, "you don't ever tell me who your sources are."
  • Trump's tweet attacking Freedom Caucus: "I'm going to let the tweet speak for itself." When asked later if the tweet was part of a "divide and conquer strategy," Spicer replied, "No, It's a math strategy. To get to 216."
  • Uh oh on tax reform: Spicer said they're "just at the beginning" of the process. In early Feb. Trump said they were near the end.
  • Legislative traffic jam: Spicer said health care, tax reform and infrastructure could all move ahead at the same time because there's "lots of tracks."
  • On Trump's meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping: "We have big problems. Everything from the South China Sea, to trade, to North Korea."
  • Internet privacy rules: Trump supports Congressional rolling back Obama-era Internet privacy protections.
  • Paris agreement: The White House will decide whether to pull out of the Paris climate accord by the G7 summit in late May, if not earlier.
  • On whether Trump discusses the Trump Organization with his sons, as Eric Trump revealed last week: "That's a question for the Trump Organization... everything he's done has been in accordance with his ethics counsel."

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
2 mins ago - Technology

Tech's race problem is all about power

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As problematic as the tech industry's diversity statistics are, activists say the focus on those numbers overlooks a more fundamental problem — one less about numbers than about power.

What they're saying: In tech, they argue, decision-making power remains largely concentrated in the hands of white men. The result is an industry whose products and working conditions belie the industry rhetoric about changing the world for the better.

Mayors fear long-lasting effects of COVID-19

Data: Menino Survey of Mayors; Chart: Axios Visuals

U.S. mayors tend to be an optimistic bunch, but a poll released Thursday finds them unusually pessimistic about prospects for post-pandemic recovery.

Why it matters: In a survey of mayors of 130 U.S. cities with more than 75,000 residents, 80% expect racial health disparities to widen, and an alarming number predict that schools, transit systems and small businesses will continue to suffer through 2021 and beyond.

Coronavirus hospitalizations top 100,000 for the first time

Expand chart
Data: The COVID Tracking ProjectHarvard Global Health Institute; Cartogram: Danielle Alberti and Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

More than 100,000 Americans are now in the hospital with coronavirus infections — a new record, an indication that the pandemic is continuing to get worse and a reminder that the virus is still very dangerous.

Why it matters: Hospitalizations are a way to measure severe illnesses — and severe illnesses are on the rise across the U.S. In some areas, health systems and health care workers are already overwhelmed, and outbreaks are only getting worse.