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Brennan Linsley / AP

President Trump signed a law yesterday reversing an Obama-era order that forbade states from withholding federal funds from Planned Parenthood. Here's a primer on the organization, both pro and con.

For: Planned Parenthood is more than just an abortion clinic, providing an array of health services to women (and men) who would otherwise go uncared for. Because of this, they qualify for government reimbursements through Medicaid and Title X.

Against: Anti-abortion citizens should not have their tax money going to an organization that provides abortions, so Planned Parenthood should not receive any government funding.

These are the numbers each side will use to defend their point of view:

Pro-Planned Parenthood on abortion.

  • 2.5 million patients helped, according to Planned Parenthood's annual report from 2014-2015.
  • There were 682,208 cancer-related screenings and preventions — including breast exams and pap smear tests.
  • Only 3% of its services are abortions, and they also offer adoption referrals and prenatal services.
  • 1.17 million pregnancy tests given.
  • 3.5 million STI tests, given to women and men.

Anti-Planned Parenthood on abortion.

  • Washington Post gave the organization three "Pinocchios" for their "misleading" claim that abortions make up only 3% of their services.
  • 160 abortions for every one of PP's adoption referrals. In 2014-2015, there were only 2,024 adoption referrals, according to PP's annual report.
  • 34% of all abortions nationwide performed through PP, with more than 320,000 abortions performed every year, according to Live Action.
  • PP's other services account for a significantly smaller percentage of their prospective markets, Live Action noted.

Pro-Planned Parenthood on funding.

  • Less than half (43%) of the organization's funding comes from government grants and reimbursements. Congress does not write them a blank check, but only reimburses them through Medicaid and Title X, Planned Parenthood's website and report explains.
  • They do not receive any funding for abortions — the Hyde amendment outlaws government funding of abortions.

Anti-Planned Parenthood on funding.

  • The $553.7 million that Planned Parenthood receives in government grants and reimbursements, as shown in their report, allows them to perform abortions — even if the money doesn't go directly to abortion services.
  • Abortion procedures provide 1/3 of clinic income and more than 10% of total revenue.

Pro-Planned Parenthood, other.

  • Almost 80% of Planned Parenthood's patients earned an income at or below 150% of the federal poverty line, CNN reported.

Anti-Planned Parenthood, other.

  • 8 investigative videos from a pro-life group, Center for Medical Progress, seemed to reveal that some PP clinics sold fetus tissue for profit. They do receive reimbursement for the cost of procuring the tissue, but there was no evidence found that PP makes money off of the donations.

Go deeper

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.

John Weaver, Lincoln Project co-founder, acknowledges “inappropriate” messages

John Weaver aboard John McCain's campaign plane in February 2000. Photo: Robert Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images)

John Weaver, a veteran Republican operative who co-founded the Lincoln Project, declared in a statement to Axios on Friday that he sent “inappropriate,” sexually charged messages to multiple men.

  • “To the men I made uncomfortable through my messages that I viewed as consensual mutual conversations at the time: I am truly sorry. They were inappropriate and it was because of my failings that this discomfort was brought on you,” Weaver said.
  • “The truth is that I'm gay,” he added. “And that I have a wife and two kids who I love. My inability to reconcile those two truths has led to this agonizing place.”