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Data: CDC; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Overall, the number of Americans who don’t have health insurance is holding pretty steady under President Trump. The uninsured rate stood at 12.5% in the first half of this year, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The big picture: Most of those people should be eligible for Medicaid if their states expanded, or for heavily subsidized ACA coverage. That’s in line with where it’s been since the Affordable Care Act’s coverage expansion began in 2014.

Although coverage has expanded significantly across the board, the CDC’s report offers a good snapshot of who’s still uninsured.By the numbers: Being uninsured is often temporary. About 17% of people said they had been without coverage for part of the year, compared with 7% who had been uninsured for over a year.

  • A quarter of the people who were uninsured at the time the CDC interviewed them were Hispanic; 14% were black, 9% were Asian and 7% were white.
  • People between the ages of 18 and 24 were more likely to be uninsured than older or younger adults.
  • Unsurprisingly, poor people still lack health care coverage — 25% of uninsured adults in the CDC’s survey had incomes at or below the poverty line.
  • Another 25% were “near poor," meaning their household income was less than roughly $25,000 for an individual, or $50,000 for a family of 4.

Go deeper

Roger Marshall wins Republican Senate nomination in Kansas primary

Rep. Roger Marshall. Photo: Mark Reinstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Rep. Roger Marshall won the Kansas Republican Senate primary on Tuesday evening, beating former Secretary of State Kris Kobach and a slew of other candidates, AP reports.

Why it matters: Following GOP Sen. Pat Roberts' retirement announcement, some Republicans worry that if Kobach won the primary it would endanger the party's chances of keeping the seat and maintaining a majority in the Senate.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Primary races to watch in Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Washington

Photo: Michael B. Thomas/Getty Images

Primary elections on Tuesday in fives states see crowded fields of both Republicans and Democrats hoping to make the ballot in 2020.

What to watch: Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) is "fighting for her political life" in a tight primary race against Detroit City Council President Brenda Jones, who Tlaib beat by 900 votes in 2018, The New York Times writes. Senate Republicans are also watching the primary race in Kansas to see who could replace retiring Republican Sen. Pat Roberts.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 18,448,084 — Total deaths: 698,023 — Total recoveries — 11,048,174Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 4,765,170 — Total deaths: 156,668 — Total recoveries: 1,528,979 — Total tests: 57,543,852Map.
  3. States: New York City health commissioner resigns in protest of De Blasio's coronavirus response — Local governments go to war over schools.
  4. Public health: 59% of Americans support nationwide 2-week stay-at-home order in NPR poll.
  5. Politics: Trump's national security adviser returns to work after coronavirus recovery Republicans push to expand small business loan program.
  6. Sports: Indy 500 to be held without fansRafael Nadal opts out of U.S. Open.