Feb 14, 2018

The nominees for World Press Photo of the Year

One of the nominated photos: civilians who had remained in west Mosul after the battle to take the city line up for aid in the Mamun neighborhood. Photo: Ivor Prickett / The New York Times

The World Press Photo Foundation announced its 2018 award nominees today, including the six nominees for World Press Photo of the Year.

Why it matters: It's the first time that the nominees for the Photo of the Year have been announced — previously a winner had simply been selected after judging — and the winner will be selected at the foundation's award show in Amsterdam on April 12. (Warning: Some of the nominated photos are graphic or disturbing.)

The bodies of Rohingya refugees are laid out after the boat in which they were attempting to flee Myanmar capsized about eight kilometers off Inani Beach, near Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Patrick Brown / Panos Pictures / Unicef
Aisha, 14, stands for a portrait in Maiduguri, Borno State, Nigeria. After being kidnapped by Boko Haram, Aisha was assigned a suicide bombing mission, but managed to escape and find help instead of detonating the bombs. Photo: Adam Ferguson / The New York Times
A passerby comforts an injured woman after Khalid Masood drove his car into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge in London, UK, killing five and injuring multiple others. Photo: Toby Melville / Reuters
An unidentified young boy, who was carried out of the last ISIS-controlled area in the Old City of Mosul by a man suspected of being a militant, is cared for by Iraqi Special Forces soldiers. Photo: Ivor Prickett / The New York Times
José Víctor Salazar Balza, 28, catches fire amid violent clashes with riot police during a protest against President Nicolas Maduro, in Caracas, Venezuela. Photo: Ronaldo Schemidt / AFP

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Coronavirus dashboard

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  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 1,513,358 — Total deaths: 88,415 — Total recoveries: 329,329Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 p.m. ET: 430,376 — Total deaths: 14,739 — Total recoveries: 23,707Map.
  3. Federal government latest: Top Trump administration officials had been developing a plan to give cloth masks to huge numbers of Americans, but the idea lost traction amid heavy internal skepticism.
  4. States latest: New York has reported more cases than the most-affected countries in Europe. Chicago's Cook County jail is largest-known source of coronavirus in U.S.
  5. Business: One-third of U.S. jobs are at risk of disappearing, mostly affecting low-income workers.
  6. World: WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus urged countries to put politics aside "if you don’t want to have many more body bags.”
  7. Environment: COVID-19 is underscoring the connection between air pollution and dire outcomes from respiratory diseases.
  8. Tech: A new report recommends stimulus spending to help close the digital divide revealed by social distancing.
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U.S. coronavirus updates: New York tops previous day's record death toll

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

New York's death toll surged to its highest one-day total on Wednesday — beating the previous day's record. 779 people died in the state in 24 hours. The state has reported more cases than the most-affected countries in Europe.

Why it matters: Public health officials have warned this would be a particularly deadly week for America, even as New York began to see declining trends of hospitalizations and ICU admissions.

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The pandemic and pollution

New York City's skyline on a smoggy day in May 2019. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

COVID-19 is underscoring the connection between air pollution and dire outcomes from respiratory diseases.

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