Jul 4, 2017

The Internet's live video duopoly: Facebook vs YouTube

Facebook launched its live platform last year. It now says 1 in 5 videos on its platform are live, and daily time spent watching Facebook Live broadcasts has grown by more than 4x.

Why it matters: The video duopoly of Facebook and YouTube is killing it in the arms race for live-streaming dominance, which should have traditional TV companies worried. Nearly half of online users watch live-streaming every week and nearly a quarter say they watch live-streaming every day, per Magid's latest social broadcasting study.

Data: Magid; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios

Facebook also announced earlier this year it's finally matching YouTube in giving publishers a 55 percent cut of ad dollars to seed its real-time offerings.

Both platforms have launched a ton of live-streaming partnerships around sports in particular. Why? Look at the type of programming watched live versus on DVR, via comScore:

  • Sports: 90% - 10%
  • News: 90% - 10%
  • Comedy: 85% - 15%
  • Movies: 85% - 15%
  • Reality: 75% - 25%
  • Drama: 71% - 29%

Go deeper

SEC football to exit CBS after 2023 season, will likely move to ESPN/ABC

Photo: David John Griffin/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

Southeastern Conference (SEC) football will no longer partner with CBS after its contract expires following the 2023 season, and will likely move to ESPN/ABC, Sports Business Journal reports.

The state of play: CBS reportedly made an aggressive bid for college football's most-watched TV package, offering about $300 million per season, but network executives decided they would rather invest the money into airing other sports, per the Sports Business Journal.

Go deeperArrowDec 21, 2019

2020 rules of the road for the Age of Misinformation

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

With just weeks to the Iowa caucuses, social media platforms have finalized their rules governing political speech — and fired a starting pistol for political strategists to find ways to exploit them from now till Election Day.

Why it matters: "One opportunity that has arisen from all these changes is how people are trying to get around them," says Keegan Goudiss, director of digital advertising for Bernie Sanders' 2016 campaign and now a partner at the progressive digital firm Revolution Messaging.

Facebook won't stop letting politicians lie in ads

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Anyone who was waiting for Facebook to change its controversial political ad policies — particularly the one that allows politicians to lie with impunity — will have to keep waiting, the company made clear Thursday.

Driving the news: Facebook released a raft of small changes to its rules around political ads, including giving consumers the option to block political ads from their feeds.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020