Jun 19, 2017

The hospital hacks you don't hear about

AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes,

Large ransomware attacks — in which hackers encrypt hospitals' data, then make them pay to de-encrypt it — aren't always reported to the Health and Human Services Department. The Wall Street Journal has an interesting dive into the reporting rules for health-care hacks, which only require companies to notify HHS when patients' medical or financial data has been exposed.

Why it matters: Hospitals don't want the expensive black eye that can come with the public disclosure of a big data breach. But public reporting is one of the key ways that hospitals learn from each other's misfortunes. In a field that's incredibly vulnerable to cyberattacks, striking that balance is critically important.

Go deeper

Palantir CEO reflects on work with ICE

Palantir CEO Alex Karp told "Axios on HBO" that there have "absolutely" been moments he wished the company hadn't taken a contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

  • "Did I suffer? ... I've had some of my favorite employees leave," Karp told "Axios on HBO."

Michigan governor won't apologize for coronavirus lockdown

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer defended the strictness of her state's coronavirus lockdown in an interview with "Axios on HBO," saying it was necessary — despite the protests that have drawn national attention — because of how quickly the state's cases were rising.

The big picture: Whitmer, who has been a frequent target of President Trump, insisted that she had to act in the face of a lack of federal leadership — and that thousands more people in her state would have died without the lockdown.

World coronavirus updates

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Axios Visuals

New Zealand now has only one novel coronavirus patient in hospital and just 22 active cases in the country, top health official Ashley Bloomfield confirmed at a briefing. He's "confident we have broken the chain of domestic transmission," with no new cases reported for most of May, he added.

By the numbers: Brazil on Monday recorded for the first time more deaths from the novel coronavirus in a single day than the United States, Reuters notes. Brazil reported 807 deaths from COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, compared to 620 in the U.S. for the same period.