Barista Eviana Dan holds espresso beans at Millcreek Coffee Roasters. Photo: Rick Bowmer / AP

One new trend to watch: high-end coffee. The Wall Street Journal's Charles Passy writes, "Americans have long moved past the ho-hum cup—first embracing the higher-end brews offered by Starbucks and now enjoying what is called the 'third wave' in coffee, with emphasis on farm-to-table sourcing and alternative brew methods."

"To justify eye-popping prices, high-end java spots use rare beans, fancy machines, elaborate preparations and heaps of hyperbole"

"Eleven Madison Park, the Michelin-starred dining spot [in New York] ... just began offering a $24 cup of joe. Maya Albert, the restaurant's coffee director, spends about 10 minutes preparing the beverage tableside.""She uses her Silverton 'dripper,' a brewing apparatus that resembles something out of a chemistry lab. She carefully times each of the three stages of the process, including the all-important 'bloom' period when the ground beans first make contact with the hot water.""In Southern California, $55 ... will ... get a special cup at Klatch Coffee, which plans to roll out ... Esmeralda Geisha 601 [next month]. The '601' refers to the price per pound that the coffee sold for at auction."

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Nxivm cult leader Keith Raniere sentenced to life in prison

Carts full of court documents related to the U.S. v. Keith Raniere case arrive at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York in May 2019. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Nxivm cult leader Keith Raniere, 60, was sentenced to 120 years in prison on Tuesday in federal court for sex trafficking among other crimes, the New York Times reports.

Catch up quick: Raniere was charged last summer with sex trafficking, conspiracy, sexual exploitation of a child, racketeering, forced labor and possession of child pornography. His so-called self-improvement workshops, which disguised rampant sexual abuse, were popular among Hollywood and business circles.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
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For decades, the share of Americans moving to new cities has been falling. The pandemic-induced rise of telework is turning that trend around.

Why it matters: This dispersion of people from big metros to smaller ones and from the coasts to the middle of the country could be a boon for dozens of left-behind cities across the U.S.

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