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Republicans want to roll back the Medicaid expansion, cap federal Medicaid spending increases, and add work requirements, drug testing, time limits, copays and premiums to some state Medicaid programs. But almost no one else wants to do these things. One poll finding goes a long way toward explaining why: Republicans view Medicaid as a form of welfare, and pretty much everyone else views it as a government insurance program.

Expand chart
Data: Kaiser Family Foundation Health Tracking Poll, May 16-22, 2017; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Why it matters: Welfare remains unpopular in our country; it's always popular to limit or cut "welfare". Whether it should be, and what this says about us, is a different question.

What the poll found: As the chart shows, Democrats (73%) and independents (62%) view Medicaid as an insurance program similar to others that help people pay for health care. But a slight majority of Republicans (52%), see it as more similar to welfare programs like food stamps.

Between the lines: One reason Medicaid limits are no slam dunk for Republicans in the Senate may be that not all Republicans view it as welfare: 46% see it as insurance, just as most Democrats and Independents do. Republicans who are more moderate are worried about the practical effects on citizens and states of rolling back the expansion or cutting federal Medicaid spending. One assumes they wouldn't worry as much unless they viewed Medicaid as valuable health insurance coverage.

Perceptions of Medicaid as welfare don't seem bothered much by facts, such as, for example, that two thirds of Medicaid spending goes for the low income elderly and disabled who don't fit the Ronald Reagan era image of the welfare king or queen. But it's not the majority view in any case. A little less than a third of voters identify as Republicans today, and about half of them see Medicaid as welfare.

It's this group and their perceptions of the program, and elected officials who share their views, that seem to be driving debate about Medicaid today.

Go deeper

6 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

8 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus cases rose 10% in the week before Thanksgiving.
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York coronavirus restrictions.
  3. World: Expert says COVID vaccine likely won't be available in Africa until Q2 of 2021 — Europeans extend lockdowns.
  4. Economy: The winners and losers of the COVID holiday season.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.

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