Axios' Sara Fischer with Snapchat's Peter Hamby. Photo: Chuck Kennedy

Axios' Sara Fischer put the future of media on the hot seat at Axios' Future of Media event Tuesday evening in D.C., which highlighted insights from Axios' Co-Founder & CEO Jim VandeHei and experts at Snapchat, Edelman, and Goldman Sachs. To kick it off, VandeHei pointed out that "all of our minds are cluttered…to punch through you need something sharp and clear. That's what we tell advertisers" at Axios.

What separates Snapchat from other platforms is that "we have hired journalists" to "add context to" the content on Snapchat to "curate" the video and content, Snapchat's Peter Hamby, the host of Good Luck America, said. He added "most video content on your phones is just repurposed from television."

Dealing with Trump: Laura Gentles, Executive Vice President and Group Head and Client Relationship Manager said, "we always have to think strategically about ways to avoid the spotlight" for clients at Edelman, citing an example of how employees have had to advise clients on how to deal with when Trump tweets at them.

The most surprising media trend to Liz Bowyer, Global Co-Head of Brand & Content Strategy at Goldman Sachs, is how podcasts have taken off. "That people still want to be informed, that they're willing to engage in content in long form, it's not just quick, snappable" content is a surprise.

"The pendulum swinging against social platforms," like Facebook, is the media trend that's caught VandeHei most off guard. "You basically went from an era where we all were gaga about people having massive controls over…our data…That has swung back."

One of Sara Fischer's speed round questions for each panelist: The future of media is…

  • VandeHei: "a hell of a lot different than it is today"
  • Hamby: "vertical video"
  • Gentles: "audience"
  • Bowyer: "hopeful. I think it's been incredibly messy…it's been the wild west of content. We're at an inflection point."

Go deeper

The nationwide K-12 tipping point

Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

The doors of public schools are swiftly slamming shut for many Americans ahead of this next school year.

Driving the news: Los Angeles and San Diego are starting out online-only this fall, forcing 825,000 students to learn with a laptop.

Updated 23 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 12,995,037 — Total deaths: 570,435 — Total recoveries — 7,157,634Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 3,341,838— Total deaths: 135,425 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. World: WHO head: There will be no return to the "old normal" for the foreseeable future — Hong Kong Disneyland closing due to surge.
  4. States: California orders sweeping rollback of open businesses as virus cases surge — Cuomo says New York will use formula to determine if reopening schools is safe.
  5. Politics: McEnany denies White House issued "opposition research" on Fauci.
56 mins ago - Podcasts

Teachers union president on reopening schools

The school year begins soon in certain states, but we're getting further away from a national consensus on if and how schools should reopen for in-person learning.

Axios Re:Cap talks with Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, to better understand where we are and where we’re going.

Go deeper: Los Angeles and San Diego public schools will be online only this fall