The gap in how much stock different sectors of society owns has widened since the financial crisis, leaving wealthier people owning more stock than everyone else, per a Gallup analysis.

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Data: Gallup; Note: Personal ownership or with spouse, includes individual stock, market fund, 401(k) and IRA; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

What the analysis shows: Every income bracket has fewer people invested in the stock market after the crisis — except for those households with incomes above $100,000, which actually increased their stock investments. Adults older than 65 also upped their investments.

What it means: Wealthier households have been benefitting from the recovery and upward trends in the stock market while middle income households aren't since they haven't been buying in to the stock market.

Why it matters: This indicates wealth inequality may be alive and well, and shows that the financial crisis may have "fundamentally changed" how middle income households view stocks as an investment, as Gallup's Jeffrey M. Jones put it.

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House will not hold votes until Sept. 14 unless stimulus deal is reached

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.0 announced Monday that the House will not hold any floor votes until Sept. 14, though members will remain on 24-hour notice to return to Washington in case a deal on coronavirus stimulus is reached.

Why it matters: Democrats and the Trump administration remain deadlocked and have not met since negotiations broke down without a deal on Friday.

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Trump says he'll accept nomination at White House or Gettysburg

Trump at the 2016 Republican National Convention. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Monday that he'll deliver his speech accepting the Republican nomination for president at either the Gettysburg battlefield in Pennsylvania or at the White House.

The state of play: Republican National Convention planners are looking for a new venue for the president to deliver his acceptance speech after convention events were canceled in Jacksonville, Fla., due to coronavirus concerns.