A homeless man sleeps in front of his tent along Van Ness Avenue in downtown San Francisco. Photo: Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images

A few recent stories highlight the paradox of living in the Bay Area.

Why it matters: For all its history as a place of great tolerance, the economic impact of the tech boom has made the region a harsh place for many not tied to the boom.

1. Posh restaurants bloom while local institutions close.

As The Verge's Lauren Goode notes, Nobu has opened an outpost in downtown Palo Alto, but a restaurant/beer garden that has been in the region for 60 years is closing because it can't afford the rising rent.

2. An SF Target has taken to locking up tents.

There are so many people living on the streets and underpasses of San Francisco that a local Target store has taken to putting its stock of camping tents under lock and key.

3. Even the beach can be inaccessible.

Venture capitalist Vinod Khosla has had a long running battle over whether he has to provide coastal access through his Half Moon Bay residence. Having lost so far, Khosla now plans to take the battle to the U.S. Supreme Court. He's turning the issue into a battle over a California law that guarantees public access to the state's coast.

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Updated 24 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Mary Trump book: How she leaked Trump financials to NYT

Simon & Schuster

In her new memoir, President Trump's niece reveals how she leaked hordes of confidential Trump family financial documents to the New York Times in an effort to expose her uncle, whom she portrays as a dangerous sociopath.

Why it matters: Trump was furious when he found out recently that Mary Trump, a trained psychologist, would be publishing a tell-all memoir. And Trump's younger brother, Robert, tried and failed to block the publication of "Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man."

Updated 35 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 p.m. ET: 11,691,068 — Total deaths: 540,062 — Total recoveries — 6,349,542Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3:30 p.m. ET: 2,963,244 — Total deaths: 130,813 — Total recoveries: 924,148 — Total tested: 36,225,015Map.
  3. 2020: Biden releases plan to strengthen coronavirus supply chain.
  4. Congress: Trump administration notifies Congress of intent to withdraw from WHO.
  5. Public health: Fauci says it's a "false narrative" to take comfort in lower coronavirus death rate.
  6. World: Brazil's President Bolsonaro tests positive— India reports third-highest case count in the world.
55 mins ago - Health

Fauci: "False narrative" to take comfort in lower coronavirus death rate

Anthony Fauci testifies in Washington, D.C., on June 30. Photo: Al Drago/AFP via Getty Images

Anthony Fauci said at an event with Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) on Tuesday "that it's a false narrative to take comfort in a lower rate of death" from the coronavirus in the U.S., warning: "There’s so many other things that are dangerous and bad about the virus. Don’t get into false complacency."

The big picture: The mean age of Americans currently being infected by the virus has declined by 15 years compared to where it stood several months ago. This has been one contributing factor in the lower death rate the U.S. has experienced during the recent surge in cases, since "the younger you are, the better you do, and the less likely you're gonna get seriously ill and die," Fauci said.