Workers are seen in the circular lobby of a hotel. Photo: Adrian Sainz / AP

Ways hotels will change in 2018, by Nikki Ekstein, travel editor at Bloomberg Pursuits: "In response to the many geo-political, sociological, and technological changes that took place in 2017, five-star hotels are making changes—some small, some large."

Below are five major ways we can expect hotels to be different in 2018.

  1. "Marriott's experimental 'Internet of Things room' ... includes showers that remember a guest's preferred temperature, digital wall art that can be swapped for family photos, and mirrors with embedded displays — for on-demand yoga videos. The rooms will soft-launch in 2018; W hotels will likely be first to offer them."
  2. "Hotels in major U.S. markets will become more expensive next year as the practice of adding resort fees, once reserved for getaways in exotic locales, becomes more and more common at urban properties — often with a nightly price tag of $25."
  3. Turndown service is being reduced, for reasons of cost and privacy.
  4. "Living room-like check-in areas are ... popping up at some of the world's finest properties."
  5. Look for more "experiences": local walking tours, comped theater tickets, exhibits in the hotels, manager receptions for frequent guests.

Go deeper

Grand jury indicts ex-officer who shot Breonna Taylor for wanton endangerment

A memorial to Breonna Taylor in downtown Louisville, Kentucky on Sept. 23. Photo: Jeff Dean/AFP via Getty Images

A grand jury has indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March and shot her at least eight times, on three counts of wanton endangerment.

The state of play: None of the three officers involved in the botched drug raid will face charges related to the actual death of Taylor, such as homicide or manslaughter. Two officers were not charged at all.

FDA chief vows agency will not accept political pressure on coronavirus vaccine

Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephen Hahn promised that "science will guide our decision" for a coronavirus vaccine at a Senate hearing on Wednesday.

Why it matters: More Americans are expressing doubt about a first-generation vaccine, despite President Trump's efforts to push an unrealistic timeline that conflicts with medical experts in his administration.

CEO confidence rises for the first time in over 2 years

Data: Business Roundtable; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

A closely-watched CEO economic confidence index rose for the first time after declining for nine straight quarters, according to a survey of 150 chief executives of the biggest U.S. companies by trade group Business Roundtable.

Why it matters: The index, which still remains at a decade low, reflects corporate America's expectations for sales, hiring and spending — which plummeted amid uncertainty when the pandemic hit.

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