Charley Snyder and Michael Sulmeyer have a look on Lawfare at a draft executive order reported by the Washington Post on Friday that would trigger different reviews related to cybersecurity policy. They call it a "reasonable start" but say they think it shows a certain lack of coordination on the issue:

"At its core, this order loosely follows a traditional formula to estimate risk: assess the threat from adversaries, your vulnerability to that threat, and the consequences if the vulnerability is exploited. In essence, the Administration wants to get a better idea of our nation's vulnerabilities and the threats it faces and to determine what tools we might have at our disposal to protect critical infrastructure from those adversaries. "

What isn't in the draft: A nod at the international implications of cybersecurity, a discussion of the FBI's role and "consideration of broader criminal and legal issues."

Why this matters: The relevance of cybersecurity to the highest levels of government have only grown in the last year, with high profile hacks affecting major corporations and political players alike. Trump has tapped Rudy Giuliani to advise him on cybersecurity issues.

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Updated 18 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 20,452,313 — Total deaths: 745,530— Total recoveries: 12,640,013Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6 p.m. ET: 5,187,611 — Total deaths: 165,831 — Total recoveries: 1,714,960 — Total tests: 63,252,257Map.
  3. Politics: Pelosi says Mnuchin told her White House is "not budging" on stimulus position.
  4. Business: U.S. already feeling effects of ending unemployment benefits.
  5. Public health: America's two-sided COVID-19 response America is flying blind on its coronavirus response.
  6. Education: New Jersey governor allows schools to reopenGallup: America's confidence in public school system jumps to highest level since 2004.

Harris previews dual role in debut speech: Attacking Trump and humanizing Biden

Sen. Kamala Harris began her first speech as Joe Biden's running mate excoriating President Trump for his "mismanagement" of the coronavirus and scorn for the racial justice movement, before quickly pivoting to how she came to know Biden: through her friendship with his late son Beau.

Why it matters: The debut speech on Wednesday underscored the dual roles that Harris will take on for the rest of the campaign — humanizing Biden during a moment of national crisis and "prosecuting" the case against Trump as a failed president.

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The two sides of America's coronavirus response

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

America's bungled political and social response to the coronavirus exists side-by-side with a record-breaking push to create a vaccine with U.S. companies and scientists at the center.

Why it matters: America's two-sided response serves as an X-ray of the country itself — still capable of world-beating feats at the high end, but increasingly struggling with what should be the simple business of governing itself.