Jul 21, 2017

The 5 most popular stories from Trump's first 6 months as POTUS

Steven Senne, Carolyn Kaster, Susan Walsh, Evan Vucci, Alex Brandon / AP

A story written on Sally Yates firing has received the most social engagements of any other Trump story since he took office, according to SocialFlow. It used an algorithm to calculate which published stories had the most total engagement seconds based on whether someone clicked, reacted to, commented on or shared the article. Here are the top 5 most engaged stories from Trump's first 6 months in office:

  1. Sally Yates fired, Jan.31
  2. Trump calls for investigation into alleged voter fraud, Jan 26
  3. House forced to postpone first ACA repeal vote, March 24
  4. Developments in the Trump-Russia dossier story, March 23
  5. Mar a Lago kitchen cited for health violations, April 13

(The publishers of the stories could not be disclosed.)

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