May 24, 2017

The 10 highest-paid CEOs in America

Evan Vucci / AP

"The typical CEO at the biggest U.S. companies got an 8.5% raise last year, raking in $11.5 million in salary, stock and other compensation last year, according to a study by executive data firm Equilar for The Associated Press. That's the biggest raise in three years."

  • "The bump reflects how well stocks have done under these CEOs' watch. Boards of directors increasingly require that CEOs push their stock price higher to collect their maximum possible payout, and the Standard & Poor's 500 index returned 12% last year."
  • "Female CEOs once again saw bigger pay raises last year than their male counterparts, but they continue to account for only a small percentage of the overall ranks."

Here are the 10 highest-paid CEOs for 2016, as calculated by AP and Eqular, with change from last year:

  1. Tom Rutledge, Charter Communications, $98 million, Up 499%
  2. Les Moonves, CBS Corp., $68.6 million, Up 22%
  3. Bob Iger, Walt Disney Co., $41 million, Down 6%
  4. David Zaslav, Discovery Communications, $37.2 million, Up 15%
  5. Robert Kotick, Activision Blizzard Inc., $33.1 million, Up 358%
  6. Brian Roberts, Comcast Corp., $33 million, Down 9%
  7. Jeff Bewkes, Time Warner Inc., $32.6 million, Up 3%
  8. Ginni Rometty, IBM, $32.3 million, Up 63%
  9. Leonard Schleifer, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, $28.3 million, Down 40%
  10. Steve Wynn, Wynn Resorts, $28.2 million, Up 36%

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