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Evan Vucci / AP

"The typical CEO at the biggest U.S. companies got an 8.5% raise last year, raking in $11.5 million in salary, stock and other compensation last year, according to a study by executive data firm Equilar for The Associated Press. That's the biggest raise in three years."

  • "The bump reflects how well stocks have done under these CEOs' watch. Boards of directors increasingly require that CEOs push their stock price higher to collect their maximum possible payout, and the Standard & Poor's 500 index returned 12% last year."
  • "Female CEOs once again saw bigger pay raises last year than their male counterparts, but they continue to account for only a small percentage of the overall ranks."

Here are the 10 highest-paid CEOs for 2016, as calculated by AP and Eqular, with change from last year:

  1. Tom Rutledge, Charter Communications, $98 million, Up 499%
  2. Les Moonves, CBS Corp., $68.6 million, Up 22%
  3. Bob Iger, Walt Disney Co., $41 million, Down 6%
  4. David Zaslav, Discovery Communications, $37.2 million, Up 15%
  5. Robert Kotick, Activision Blizzard Inc., $33.1 million, Up 358%
  6. Brian Roberts, Comcast Corp., $33 million, Down 9%
  7. Jeff Bewkes, Time Warner Inc., $32.6 million, Up 3%
  8. Ginni Rometty, IBM, $32.3 million, Up 63%
  9. Leonard Schleifer, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, $28.3 million, Down 40%
  10. Steve Wynn, Wynn Resorts, $28.2 million, Up 36%

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
6 mins ago - World

What has and hasn't changed as Biden takes over U.S. foreign policy

Photo Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden swiftly recommitted the U.S. to the Paris climate pact and the World Health Organization, but America's broader foreign policy is in a state of flux between the Trump and Biden eras.

Driving the news: One of the most striking moves from the Biden administration thus far was a show of continuity — concurring with the Trump administration's last-minute determination that China had committed "genocide" against Uyghur Muslims.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Health: New coronavirus cases down, but more bad news ahead — Fighting COVID-19's effects on gender equality.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: NYC postpones vaccine appointments following shipment delays — Private companies step in to fill vaccine logistics vacuum.
  4. World: Biden will order U.S. to rejoin World Health OrganizationBiden to bring U.S. into global COVAX initiative for equitable vaccine access.
Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Congress grants waiver for retired Gen. Lloyd Austin to lead Pentagon

Defense Secretary nominee Lloyd Austin. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Both chambers of Congress on Thursday voted to grant retired Gen. Lloyd Austin a waiver to lead the Pentagon, clearing the path to confirmation for President Biden's nominee for defense secretary.

Why it matters: Austin's nomination received pushback from some lawmakers, including Democrats, who cited a law that requires officers be out of the military for at least seven years before taking the job — a statute intended to reinforce the tradition of civilian control of the Pentagon.