Nov 8, 2019

The night of the wayward texts

Photo: Tim Robberts/Getty Images

If you woke up to a weird text Thursday, you aren't alone: A mysterious wave of messages swept America's phones overnight, delivering puzzling messages from friends, family and the occasional ex, the AP reports.

What happened: Friends who hadn't talked in months were jolted into chatting. The best explanation seems to be that old texts sent in the spring suddenly went through.

What they're saying: Mobile carriers offered unhelpful explanations for the weird-text phenomenon, which appeared to be widespread, at least according to social media.

  • A Sprint spokeswoman said it resulted from a "maintenance update" for messaging platforms at multiple U.S. carriers and would not explain further.
  • T-Mobile called it a "third party vendor issue." Verizon and AT&T did not answer questions.

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Study: Smartphone use spikes anxiety, depression in 25% of youth

Illustration: Axios Visuals/Sarah Grillo

Roughly 25% of youths experience depression, anxiety, poor sleep and high stress due to "problematic smartphone use," according to new research published Friday in BMC Psychiatry.

Why it matters: The report says that how young people use smartphones — in ways that mimic behavioral addiction — could be more harmful for mental health than the phones themselves.

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T-Mobile's quid pro quos for the Sprint deal

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

T-Mobile dangled carrots before consumers and legislators on Thursday, promising cut-rate plans along with free 5G service to first responders as well as home broadband for 10 million U.S. families.

The catch: The promises all depend upon a successful close of the company's pending deal to buy Sprint.

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Texas and Nevada exit T-Mobile-Sprint lawsuit

Photo: ALASTAIR PIKE/AFP via Getty Images

Nevada and Texas announced Monday they are dropping out of the suit that seeks to block T-Mobile's acquisition of Sprint. Texas said it got a number of commitments, including an agreement not to raise rates for 5 years and to ensure the state's rural areas have 5G coverage.

Why it matters: The lawsuit from the states is the main remaining hurdle to the deal's closure. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton was the only Republican seeking to block the deal.

Go deeperArrowNov 26, 2019