Mar 2, 2019

I testified against Nixon. My advice for Michael Cohen

In 1973, John Dean, takes the oath from the Senate Watergate committee chairman, Sam Ervin. (Bettmann Archive via Getty Images)

John W. Dean, age 80, who was fired as White House counsel by President Nixon, writes for the N.Y. Times:

What's new: "There are several parallels between my testimony before Congress in 1973, about President Richard Nixon and his White House, and Michael Cohen’s testimony this week about President Trump and his business practices. ... [W]e both found ourselves speaking before Congress, in multiple open and closed venues, about criminal conduct of a sitting president."

Why it matters: "I was surprised by the number of people who surfaced to support my account. The same, I suspect, will happen for Michael Cohen. The Mafia’s code of omertà has no force in public service. I have heard no one other than Roger Stone say he will go to jail for Donald Trump."

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