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Elon Musk. Photo: Win McNamee / Staff

Tesla on Wednesday abandoned its federal lawsuit against Alameda County, California, over pandemic-related restrictions on business operations that affected its factory in Fremont.

Details: Tesla did not provide immediate comment. But the case filed May 9 appears to be a fait accompli at this point.

Tesla reportedly told employees a few days ago that county officials approved the resumption of operations. Tesla had already reopened the plant in defiance of the local government.

The big picture: The lawsuit against county orders was part of CEO Elon Musk's broader, contentious battle over public health restrictions during the pandemic that he called excessive.

  • Musk has also threatened to move the company's HQ and "future programs" from the state, but the status of those plans remains unclear.
  • Even before the pandemic, Tesla was planning to build an additional factory to produce Model Y crossovers for East Coast delivery, as well as its planned Cybertruck.
  • The company is reportedly eyeing Austin, Texas, and Tulsa, Oklahoma, for that plant.

Go deeper

Jul 26, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Tesla's election-year gift to Texas

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Tesla's decision to build a $1 billion factory in Texas is a good bit of economic news for a state that's suffering in the throes of the pandemic.

Why it matters: The creation of 5,000 new manufacturing jobs near Austin comes as the state's ongoing coronavirus outbreak threatens to overwhelm hospital systems and tears at the economy.

Woman who allegedly stole laptop from Pelosi's office to sell to Russia is arrested

Photo: FBI

A woman accused of breaching the Capitol and planning to sell to Russia a laptop or hard drive she allegedly stole from Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office was arrested in Pennsylvania's Middle District Monday, the Department of Justice said.

Driving the news: Riley June Williams, 22, is charged with illegally entering the Capitol as well as violent entry and disorderly conduct. She has not been charged over the laptop allegation and the case remains under investigation, per the DOJ.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID-related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.