Technology

More than 50 nations, but not U.S., sign onto cybersecurity pact

French President Emmanuel Macron
French President Emmanuel Macron seen after the opening session of the Paris Peace Forum. Photo: Artur Widak/NurPhoto via Getty Images

French President Emmanuel Macron released an international agreement on cybersecurity principles Monday as part of the Paris Peace Forum. The original signatories included more than 50 nations, 130 private sector groups and 90 charitable groups and universities, but not the United States, Russia or China.

The big picture: The Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace is another step in the disjointed effort to create international norms and laws for cybersecurity and warfare. In most international matters of regulating the internet, there tends to be a wide split between the liberal Western order and authoritarian nations like Russia and China.

Uber develops system for categorizing sexual assault claims

Uber logo
Photo: Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Uber released a new report Monday, created in partnership with the National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) and the Urban Institute, that outlined a new "taxonomy" for categorizing incidents of sexual harassment, misconduct and assault.

Why it matters: Underreporting of incidents and differences in definitions make it difficult to collect data on sexual misconduct. Uber's hope is that a standardized taxonomy — which categorizes 21 types of misconduct ranging from "staring and leering" to "non-consensual sexual penetration" — will help companies respond more effectively to allegations of abuse. Uber and its main competitor Lyft have taken similar steps this year to make it easier to report incidents of sexual assault and harassment, like removing a requirement for mandatory arbitration.

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