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An essential plan for gathering global data

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Servers at a Facebook data center in Sweden. Photo: Jonathan Nackstrand / AFP / Getty Images

There's a solution in Congress that will help law enforcement gather electronic evidence, often stored on servers abroad, while reducing conflicts of law facing cloud storage providers: the Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act.

Why it matters: Data — meaning evidence — is now global. The CLOUD Act makes clear when U.S. warrants apply, considers the applicable laws of other countries, and creates a framework for bilateral cooperative agreements that allow for cross-border data requests to be handled through domestic legal processes. The proposed U.S.-UK agreement is a good model. 

Dan Primack 15 mins ago
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Rover raises $155 million to walk your dog

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Rover, a Seattle-based pet-sitting and walking platform, raised $155 million in new funding led by T. Rowe Price at a post-money valuation just south of $1 billion.

Why it's a big deal: Because this reflects how some deep-pocketed investors aren't succumbing to the shock-and-awe investment strategy of SoftBank, which recently plugged $300 million into Rover rival Wag.

Michael Sykes 1 hour ago
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Europe's GDPR data regulations prompt blackout of Tronc websites

The Los Angeles Times building
The Los Angeles Times is one of Tronc's papers. Photo: Frederick Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Websites owned by the media company Tronc are blacked out in Europe because of the newly-enacted General Data Protection Regulations, reports the New York Times.

The bottom line: The GDPR is a set of new data regulations that set a framework for data collection and privacy for internet users in the European Union. Though companies had two years to prepare for the new rules, Tronc was willing to black out their sites in Europe to avoid facing stiff penalties — which can go as high as 4% of a company's global revenue.