Nov 16, 2018

Tech industry takes on D.C.

DC mayor Muriel Bowser. Photo: Jahi Chikwendiu/The Washington Post via Getty Images

After the D.C. City Council this week approved a hotel-industry-backed bill that caps on how often you can rent a property via Airbnb, the local tech industry is beginning an urgent push to get Mayor Muriel Bowser to veto it.

Details: Here's the letter being sent by the Consumer Tech Association, the Internet Association, NetChoice and Travel Tech tomorrow. Key line: "[This bill] sends a message that D.C. is not open to innovative businesses and is not a place for the technology sector to invest in."

The backstory: "The D.C. Council voted unanimously Tuesday to impose some of the tightest limits in the nation on Airbnb and other short-term rental companies," the WashPost's Bob McCartney and Peter Jamison report.

  • "If signed by Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D), the measure would prevent D.C. property owners from renting out second homes on a short-term basis and bar them from renting spare rooms or basements in their primary residences for more than 90 days per year when the host is away."

Why it matters: "Supporters of the crackdown said it was necessary in a city where short-term rentals are making an overheated real estate market even more difficult for would-be home buyers and renters."

Read the letter:

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