Protestors in New York on June 1. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

While most of the Big Tech companies or their CEOs have spoken out against the Trump administration's family separation policy, there are some notable exceptions: Oracle, which has been close to the administration and does a tremendous amount of government business, hasn't condemned the practice.

Why it matters: Some industry leaders find themselves caught between outraged employees and customers and longstanding business relationships with government.

  • Also yet to comment are any of the big four telecom firms — AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon.
  • IBM, which is also close to the administration and had not previously weighed in, posted a statement Wednesday morning: "The administration should not wait for an act of Congress to end the inhumane policy of separating children from their families."
  • Others who have thus far declined requests for comment: Amazon, Qualcomm and Nvidia.

Meanwhile: A Facebook fundraiser started by Dave and Charlotte Willner has now raised more than $8.8 million to fund legal help for those being detained.

And: Github and Medium took down posts that offered details on individual ICE employees scraped from LinkedIn, saying they violated policies designed to prevent targeting or harassment of individuals. Twitter also pulled down an account that had been tweeting from the same list.

Go deeper

Updated 39 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after COVID exposure puts others at risk — Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic"— COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week — Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear themU.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for second consecutive day.
  3. World: Italy tightens restrictions Spain declares new state of emergency.

Amy Coney Barrett's immediate impact

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

In her first week on the job, Amy Coney Barrett may be deciding which votes to count in the presidential election. By her third week, she’ll be deciding the fate of the Affordable Care Act.

Where it stands: The Senate votes on Barrett’s nomination tomorrow. If she’s confirmed, Chief Justice John Roberts is expected to swear her in at the Supreme Court within hours, an administration official tells Axios.

Texas Democrats beg Biden to spend now

Photo: Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

The Biden campaign is rebuffing persistent pleas from Texas Democrats to spend at least $10 million in the Lone Star state, several people familiar with the talks tell Axios.

Why it matters: If Texas — which has 38 electoral votes and is steadily getting more blue, but hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1976 — flipped to the Biden column, it would be game over. But the RealClearPolitics polling average stubbornly hovers at +2.6 for Trump — and Team Biden appears more focused on closer targets.