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James Bryant, left, and his wife Eunice register to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at St. Johns Missionary Baptist Church in Tampa earlier this month. Photo: Octavio Jones/Getty Images

Tampa Bay's vaccination rate for Black residents is startlingly low.

By the numbers: Of the 54,725 people who have received the COVID-19 vaccine in Sarasota-Manatee, only 812 are Black.

  • For Sarasota County, which is 4.7% Black, that means 1.2% of vaccine doses have gone to Black residents.
  • It’s even worse in Manatee County (9.3% Black), where only 2% of doses have gone to Black residents.

Why it matters: Black people are disproportionately affected by COVID-19 infections and deaths, making them among Florida's most vulnerable residents. But they lag behind other populations when it comes to getting inoculated.

Driving the news: Several factors, including mistrust of vaccines and lack of access to both appointment registration technology and transportation to vaccination sites, are fueling the divide, Florida health experts told the Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Other Tampa Bay counties reflect similarly low Black vaccination rates:

  • Pasco: Black residents have received 2.5% of vaccine doses in a 6.7% Black county.
  • Hillsborough: 5.8% of vaccine doses in an 18% Black county.
  • Pinellas: 4.2% of vaccine doses in an 11.1% Black county.
  • Hernando: 3% of vaccine doses in a 6.1% Black county.

Of note: Black churches have taken on a key role in educating parishioners about COVID-19, including the importance of vaccines, the Tampa Bay Times reports.

Yes, but: Even those who want the shot are having trouble getting it.

  • Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Tuesday that Florida is now withholding COVID-19 vaccines so seniors and health care workers can get their second doses, after initially pressuring hospitals to administer the shots faster.

This story first appeared in the Axios Tampa Bay newsletter, designed to help readers get smarter, faster on the most consequential news unfolding in their own backyard.

Go deeper

The mad dash for COVID vaccines among Minnesota seniors

Data: Minnesota Department of Health; Chart: Michelle McGhee/Axios

Minnesota's system for scheduling COVID-19 vaccination appointments for citizens 65 and older again saw extraordinary demand this week.

By the numbers: More than 226,000 seniors entered the lottery for one of just 9,425 doses available at state pilot sites this week, MDH told Axios.

Black Lives Matter movement nominated for 2021 Nobel Peace Prize

Protestors take part in a Black Lives Matter march outside the Parliament building in Oslo, Norway in solidarity with U.S. protests over the death of George Floyd. Photo by Stian Lysberg Solum/AFP via Getty Images

The Black Lives Matter movement has been nominated for the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize for compelling countries around the world to address systemic racism.

Why it matters: The BLM movement launched in 2013 following George Zimmerman's acquittal for shooting Trayvon Martin, an unarmed Black teenager. The case kickstarted the international movement to address the controversial deaths of Black people, particularly at the hands of police.

Mike Allen, author of AM
4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden adviser Cedric Richmond sees first-term progress on reparations

Illustration: "Axios on HBO"

White House senior adviser Cedric Richmond told "Axios on HBO" that it's "doable" for President Biden to make first-term progress on breaking down barriers for people of color, while Congress studies reparations for slavery.

Why it matters: Biden said on the campaign trail that he supports creation of a commission to study and develop proposals for reparations — direct payments for African-Americans.