Trade/globalization

The 500-year-long, on-and-off uprising

Manila, 2004. Photo: Jay Directo/AFP/Getty

The mainstream assumption is that, once policy action and time have their impact, the wave of U.S. and European uprisings over globalization will subside. But that's only if you look at the problem as one that began in the last decade or two.

Expert Voices

U.S. economy is world's most competitive, but shadowed by inequality

ford trucks on an assembly line in a manufacturing plant
The assembly line for Ford F-150 trucks at the company's manufacturing facility in Dearborn, Michigan. Photo: Jeff Kowalsky/AFP/Getty Images

The United States is the world’s most competitive economy, according to a new report by the World Economic Forum. Singapore, Germany, Switzerland and Japan round out this year's top five.

What's happening: The U.S. position reflects fundamental competitive strength across 12 key areas, especially its labor market, financial system and business dynamism, which measures everything from time required to start a business to attitudes toward risk. Each of these factors contributes to America's vibrant culture of entrepreneurship and innovation.

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